STICKS OF SPICY GOOD­NESS

CIN­NA­MON HAS LONG BEEN RECOG­NISED AS DE­LI­CIOUS, BUT IT CAN ALSO BOOST YOUR HEALTH

Life & Style Weekend - - TASTE - WORDS: VICKI TAY­LOR .......................

This pop­u­lar spice is widely used in all sorts of in­ter­na­tional cuisines and I use it a lot when mak­ing up some of my spice blends. I just love it! Cin­na­mon is clas­si­fied as a spice as it is the ed­i­ble, in­ner bark of the cin­namo­mum tree. The bark is hand rolled into long quills which are cut into about 9cm lengths which is what we use in our cook­ing. When peo­ple think of cin­na­mon they gen­er­ally re­late it to be­ing used in sweet dishes, desserts in par­tic­u­lar, but cin­na­mon is used in both sweet and savoury dishes, es­pe­cially Mid­dle East­ern cuisines. I love putting it in tagines and when I have that first bite, all beau­ti­ful travel mem­o­ries of Morocco come flood­ing back There are two types of cin­na­mon; cin­na­mon verum (true cin­na­mon) and cas­sia cin­na­mon which is the more com­mon va­ri­ety, which doesn’t have the same health ben­e­fits of true cin­na­mon. Yes, cin­na­mon is also one of the health­i­est spices in the world. Be­hind turmeric and nigella seeds, it car­ries a lot of health ben­e­fits. To name a few: may help re­duce risks associated with heart dis­ease con­tains pow­er­ful an­tiox­i­dants is a nat­u­ral food preser­va­tive reg­u­lates blood sugar lev­els has anti-in­flam­ma­tory prop­er­ties helps fight bac­te­rial in­fec­tions. So the moral of the story? Get more cin­na­mon into you! Here is a sim­ple but ever so yummy In­dian rice recipe that is great as a side if you have made a curry. Of course, you can cook the rice from scratch but this is the one thing I’m hope­less at cook­ing so I do cheat!

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