GO­ING NA­TIVE

LEMON MYR­TLE AND WAT­TLE SEEDS HAVE BE­COME FAVOURITES IN THE KITCHEN BUT HERE ARE MORE SEN­SA­TIONAL FOODS TO EX­PLORE

Life & Style Weekend - - TASTE -

Be­yond the well known lemon myr­tle and wat­tle seed lies an ex­ten­sive ar­ray of na­tive food to in­spire cre­ativ­ity in the kitchen. Here’s a few more in­gre­di­ents worth try­ing.

Fin­ger lime

This quirky look­ing fruit has re­ally hit the main­stream in the last few years, es­pe­cially in the fine din­ing scene due to its caviar-like pulp. Fin­ger limes come in a va­ri­ety of colours and flavours so you can ex­per­i­ment with which you pre­fer.

Quan­dong

The quan­dong is a small red fruit which is slightly tart but highly nu­tri­tious. You’ll need to sep­a­rate the fruit from the pit­ted stone for eat­ing.

Macadamia nut

You’ll find an abun­dance of macadamia be­ing grown lo­cally on the Sun­shine Coast. Eat on their own or add to any sweet or savoury dish for ex­tra taste and crunch: it’s a ver­sa­tile nut which is just at home in a choco­late chip cookie recipe as it is as a crust on seared tuna steaks.

Bunya nuts

These nuts are na­tive to South­east Queens­land, from the bunya nut tree, which only bears fruit once the tree is 100-years-old. The nuts are of­ten used in pesto or blended to make a spread.

Desert lime

Use in place of lemon or limes. They are smaller but have an in­tense flavour and don’t need peel­ing. They also have three times the Vi­ta­min C of an orange.

Bush tomato

Bush tomato has a strong sun­dried tomato taste with caramel and tamar­illo flavours. The taste is quite strong so use spar­ingly. Only the ripened fruit should be eaten oth­er­wise it can be toxic.

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