SU­PER NEWS AT LAST

AF­TER MORE THAN A DECADE, THE IN­CRED­I­BLES ARE BACK ON SCREEN

Life & Style Weekend - - SCREENLIFE - WORDS: SEANNA CRONIN In­cred­i­bles 2 opens in cin­e­mas on Thurs­day.

Fans have waited a long time for an In­cred­i­bles se­quel, 14 years to be ex­act. Pixar hasn’t rushed things and that’s un­der­stand­able con­sid­er­ing the suc­cess of the first film, which fol­lowed a fam­ily of un­der­cover su­per­heroes who were forced out of their quiet, subur­ban lives and into ac­tion to save the world.

The In­cred­i­bles grossed more than

$633 mil­lion world­wide in­clud­ing a $70m open­ing week­end, the sec­ond-largest open­ing at the time for an an­i­mated fea­ture, and won the Os­car for Best An­i­mated Fea­ture.

Fol­low­ing on from Find­ing Nemo’s Os­car win the year be­fore, The In­cred­i­bles helped to so­lid­ify Pixar’s dom­i­nance of the an­i­mated fam­ily film space.

The Parr fam­ily and their su­per friends, in­clud­ing Sa­muel L. Jack­son’s Lu­cius Best, were also Pixar’s first wholly hu­man cast of char­ac­ters.

Writer-di­rec­tor Brad Bird, who fur­ther ce­mented his re­la­tion­ship with Pixar in 2007’s Rata­touille, re­turns to the helm for the long-awaited se­quel.

“Ev­ery­one’s pow­ers are in­spired by their role in the fam­ily and where they are in their lives at that time,” Bird says.

“We played with tra­di­tional archetypes – the strong fa­ther fig­ure and the mul­ti­task­ing mother – but in the end, we found that most of us can re­late to all of the char­ac­ters in some way. We’ve all been that im­pa­tient 10-year-old or the in­se­cure teenager. We’ve all felt like we’re shoul­der­ing an im­pos­si­ble load be­tween home and work or school, and we’ve all felt like we’re be­ing pulled in too many di­rec­tions.”

In In­cred­i­bles 2, He­len (Holly Hunter) is called on to lead a cam­paign to bring su­per­heroes back, while Bob (Craig T. Nel­son) nav­i­gates the day-to-day hero­ics of “nor­mal” life at home with their chil­dren Vi­o­let, Dash and baby Jack-jack.

“We treat be­ing a hero as a vo­ca­tion,” Bird says of the film.

“The gov­ern­ment shuts down the pro­gram that pro­tects su­pers and pro­vides them with hous­ing and jobs. So He­len and Bob are faced with a real-life dilemma. ‘What’s next? How will we pay the bills and pro­vide for our fam­ily?’ They’re just like the rest of us.”

A cham­pion of his fam­ily, Bob isn’t afraid of tak­ing on the du­ties at home.

“Bob is per­fectly ca­pa­ble of tak­ing care of Vi­o­let, Dash and Jack-jack on his own. But he has to fail a lot be­fore he can suc­ceed – like we all do ev­ery sin­gle day as par­ents,” Bird says.

“Fail­ure, how­ever, isn’t easy for this par­tic­u­lar hero to ac­cept.”

But there are plenty of sur­prises in store for Bob as Jack-jack’s su­per­pow­ers emerge.

He could be the most pow­er­ful su­per in the fam­ily, but he’s still a tod­dler with a host of needs, wants and ever-chang­ing emo­tions that keep even the best par­ent guessing.

“Any­one who’s taken care of a reg­u­lar baby day in and day out knows that it can be ex­haust­ing,” Bird says.

“Tod­dlers have cu­rios­ity and mo­bil­ity – but zero judg­ment. And Jack-jack isn’t just try­ing out one power – he has a mul­ti­tude of pow­ers go­ing on.”

Bird also lends his voice to fan-favourite Edna “E’’ Mode, the cre­ative vi­sion­ary who cre­ates the fam­ily’s cut­ting-edge su­per suits.

“E takes over ev­ery room she en­ters,” he says.

“No mat­ter how big and strong the peo­ple around her are – and she’s of­ten sur­rounded by su­pers – her per­son­al­ity just dom­i­nates.

“I think we all sum­mon our in­ner E dur­ing our most con­fi­dent mo­ments.”

IN­CRED­I­BLES 2 IS PIXAR’S 20TH FEA­TURE FILM, AND AT 1 HOUR AND 58 MIN­UTES IS THE LONG­EST OF THE STU­DIO’S FILMS TO DATE. THE NEXT PIXAR MOVIE DUE FOR RE­LEASE IS TOY STORY 4, EX­PECTED TO BE IN CIN­E­MAS BY JUNE 2019.

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