YEL­LOW IS NOT OUR COLOUR

AUS­TRALIA NEEDS A MOVE­MENT WHERE WE CAN WHINGE AND BITCH ABOUT POLITI­CIANS, WITH­OUT A YEL­LOW VEST IN SIGHT

Life & Style Weekend - - MAGAZINE | TUGBOAT TALES - WORDS: ASH­LEY ROBIN­SON

Yel­low vests could mean a lot of things – drive slower, be aware, dan­ger, look at me look at me ... In France, it means some of the peo­ple are bit­terly un­happy with their Gov­ern­ment and the way the coun­try is be­ing run.

Tens-of-thou­sands of peo­ple have been don­ning yel­low vests and join­ing the move­ment of dis­con­tent.

I no­ticed a cou­ple of weeks ago there was a sim­i­lar rally at Mooloolaba where about 20 turned up. That’s right, 20.

That says it all as far as I am con­cerned, be­cause if you lis­ten to peo­ple in the street or read the news­pa­per and lis­ten to me­dia broad­casts, we in Aus­tralia are bit­terly dis­ap­pointed with our Gov­ern­ment and ba­si­cally our po­lit­i­cal sys­tem, but we don’t do any­thing about it.

I am not say­ing that the yel­low vest move­ment is right.

I do agree with quite a bit of it, but it looks like what works in France doesn’t get much trac­tion on our shores.

Maybe we should start an­other move­ment. Pick a nat­u­ral colour – say, beige – which won’t bring un­wanted at­ten­tion to us in case the riot squad gets launched against us and call it the Bland Band.

We can gather to whinge and bitch to each other about how bad our ma­jor par­ties are and how flawed our Sen­ate is and lament hyp­o­crit­i­cal state­ments from our politi­cians who say we shouldn’t ex­pect to get a pen­sion as the coun­try can’t af­ford it, all why they have their back sup­ports on so they don’t do them­selves an in­jury while they ex­tract as much as they can out of the pub­lic trough.

While we are all whinge­ing, we can ques­tion how much Fed­eral pol­lies spend send­ing out back­slap­ping pro­pa­ganda about what a good job they do, with pho­tos in­cluded on nice glossy pa­per.

We can ask why a hus­band and wife get one each, posted to their res­i­den­tial ad­dress, as well as the hus­band get­ting one sent to his place of work.

Let’s do the math on that. Av­er­age elec­torate num­bers are about 100,000 plus one for each work per­son sounds ex­pen­sive to me, at three-times-a-year min­i­mum, all to tell us what a good job they are do­ing.

I would have thought that money could be bet­ter spent in the elec­torate, adding to the good that they are say­ing they are do­ing.

That re­ally could make a dif­fer­ence.

And they could then maybe rely on the good they are do­ing by word of mouth and deeds. Now there is an idea: deeds! The Bland Band could whinge about all this and more, like politi­cians’ ex­penses and the def­i­ni­tion of what is a rort and what is an ac­tual ex­pense.

The list is end­less of what can be talked about at the Bland Band’s meet­ings.

A for Aus­tralia; a big­ger A for apa­thy.

We are dead­est the best at it and I reckon the Bland Band will re­ally catch on – and a bit like that lot in Can­berra: noth­ing will hap­pen.

Sound fa­mil­iar?

“PICK A NAT­U­RAL COLOUR – SAY, BEIGE – WHICH WON’T BRING UN­WANTED AT­TEN­TION TO US IN CASE THE RIOT SQUAD GETS LAUNCHED AGAINST US AND CALL IT THE BLAND BAND.”

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.