FAC­ING THE FACTS ABOUT WHAT A BIG NIGHT CAN DO

Life & Style Weekend - - MAGAZINE | YOU -

We all know smash­ing out those sug­ary cock­tails on a Satur­day night not only leaves us feel­ing in­cred­i­bly un­well the next day, but also makes our skin look like ut­ter crap.

Aes­thetic skin prac­ti­tioner Sarah Hud­son re­veals the ef­fects on your skin the next day.

1. DE­HY­DRA­TION

“Al­co­hol is a di­uretic lead­ing to de­hy­dra­tion in the skin,” Sarah ex­plains. “This results in parched, crepey skin that quickly loses its lu­mi­nos­ity and glow.” For each al­co­holic bev­er­age con­sumed, you need to re­plen­ish the skin with four glasses of wa­ter.

2. PUFFI­NESS AND BLOAT­ING

“As al­co­hol is a di­uretic, it tells the body to hold on to wa­ter. The next day this results in puffi­ness and fluid retention.” The most no­tice­able signs: un­der-eye bags, puffy eye­lids, swelling around the jaw­line.

3. PIM­PLES AND BREAK­OUTS

This is prob­a­bly the most com­mon con­se­quence of drink­ing, and is a di­rect re­sult of the sug­ars found in drinks, which make the an­dro­gen hor­mone more ac­tive.

4. SKIN FLUSH­ING AND RED­NESS

If you’re prone to ‘tomato face’, then you might want to steer clear of wine – in par­tic­u­lar white wine.

“Al­co­hol is a va­sodila­tor, lead­ing to skin red­ness and flush­ing, par­tic­u­larly no­tice­able in the cheek area,” Sarah adds.

5. LONG-TERM DAM­AGE

“Over time, too much con­sump­tion of al­co­hol can lead to the sup­pres­sion of the skin’s nat­u­ral pro­tec­tive struc­ture, caus­ing sus­cep­ti­bil­ity to UV dam­age and au­toim­mune skin con­di­tions such as rosacea and pso­ri­a­sis.”

PREVEN­TION

Sarah says there are next-day steps:

1. Gen­tly ex­fo­li­ate the skin: this will re­move dull, de­hy­drated skin cells.

2. While ex­fo­li­at­ing, gen­tly mas­sage your face in cir­cu­lar mo­tions: this will help with lym­phatic drainage, de­crease the ap­pear­ance of fine lines and re­duce fa­cial puffi­ness.

3. In­vest in a LED mask light. The red light rays are proven to boost col­la­gen pro­duc­tion and the blue light rays are proven to de­stroy acne-caus­ing bac­te­ria.

– www.bodyand­soul.com.au

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