GO­ING THE DIS­TANCE “DON’T BE FOOLED BY THE IDEA THAT YOU SHOULD AP­PROACH EACH WORK­OUT FEEL­ING SU­PER FRESH.”

WE ALL WANT MORE EN­ERGY, BUT SOME­TIMES YOU HAVE TO GIVE TO GET. HERE ARE FOUR STRATE­GIES TO BUILD YOUR STAMINA

Life & Style Weekend - - MAGAZINE | EYE WELLNESS - READ MORE AT kar­lag­ilbert.com.au Cham­pion iron­woman and ocean ath­lete Karla Gil­bert is an ac­cred­ited Nu­tri­tion and Health Coach and cer­ti­fied Level III and IV Fit­ness Trainer, with cer­tifi­cates in Child Nu­tri­tion and Nu­tri­tion.

If you find you’re tear­ing your­self out of bed most morn­ings while still feel­ing the ef­fects of yes­ter­day’s ac­tiv­i­ties or un­able to make it through a typ­i­cal day with­out main­tain­ing your phys­i­cal and emo­tional en­ergy, then you prob­a­bly lack gen­eral stamina.

We all want more stamina.

It’s the holy grail of be­ing able to keep up with the rigours of daily life.

Do­ing the things we en­joy with en­ergy and en­thu­si­asm is what brings con­tent­ment to our lives, so just how do we go about achiev­ing this?

There is no clear-cut way to build phys­i­cal stamina as ev­ery­one has dif­fer­ent rates of re­sponse, but re­search has clearly shown that the tra­di­tional ways of grad­ual adap­ta­tion are not your only op­tion.

Tra­di­tion­ally, we are taught that up­ping the ante through clock­ing phys­i­cal miles might add steam to the en­gine, but this can some­times have a neg­a­tive ef­fect on en­ergy lev­els.

The good news is there are other strate­gies you can turn to that will help in­crease daily en­durance and en­ergy lev­els.

1. WORK ON YOUR MUS­CLE EN­DURANCE

Long rides, laps in the pool or spin classes will work your aer­o­bic ca­pac­ity, but if your mus­cles don’t have en­durance then this is when things go pear-shaped. High rep­e­ti­tion strength-based move­ments build mus­cle en­durance by forc­ing the mus­cles to build new cap­il­lar­ies and in­crease their oxy­gen up­take. Sim­ple body­weight ex­er­cises are per­fect for this.

2. IN­CREASE YOUR TRAIN­ING FRE­QUENCY

If you are just start­ing out, it may take a while to im­prove your en­durance port­fo­lio. Don’t be fooled by the idea that you should ap­proach each work­out feel­ing su­per fresh. Slowly in­crease the num­ber of ses­sions per week you com­plete and your mus­cles will adapt the rate at which they re­cover.

3. TRICK IT UP

Mak­ing the mis­take of only work­ing one mus­cle group at a time can be in­ef­fec­tive. By adding in cross-train­ing such as swim­ming, pi­lates or hill sprints you are re­cruit­ing cross vec­to­rial mus­cle groups while in­creas­ing car­dio fit­ness. Cross train­ing is also great for rest­ing overused mus­cles and re­duc­ing chances of in­jury.

4. GET THE TEMPO HAP­PEN­ING

Slow and steady will only get you so far. Speed en­durance im­proves the rate at which our mus­cles deal with the amount of lac­tic acid that builds up in the blood­stream. In­ter­val train­ing takes ad­van­tage of this and is done through ef­forts fol­lowed by re­cov­ery pe­ri­ods (HIIT or Ta­bata work­outs).

In­cor­po­rat­ing some of th­ese prin­ci­pals into your work­outs may use some of that much-needed en­ergy to be­gin with, but over time you will feel your en­ergy lev­els strengthen and you will be­come at­tracted to the things you love to do.

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