BE­FORE YOU GO

WE’VE GOT YOU COV­ERED WITH THESE KAKADU NA­TIONAL PARK TIPS

Life & Style Weekend - - MAGAZINE | ESCAPE - — Jennifer En­nion

GO ROAD-TRIPPIN’

Three hours’ drive from Dar­win, Kakadu Na­tional Park, cel­e­brat­ing its 40th an­niver­sary this year, is eas­ier to reach than peo­ple re­alise. In­ter­state trav­ellers can fly into Dar­win and hire a ve­hi­cle or join a tour. Main high­ways into the park are sealed and suitable for 2WD, but you’ll have a bet­ter time if you’re in a 4WD and can tackle the many dirt roads. Con­di­tions vary, es­pe­cially dur­ing the trop­i­cal sum­mer (Novem­ber-april), so solo trav­ellers need to stay on top of re­ports. Call into Bowali Vis­i­tor Cen­tre to ask rangers about which roads are open and to buy a park pass.

HOW MUCH?

The price of a park pass de­pends on the sea­son. Up to the end of April, you’ll pay $65 for a family of four, or $25 an adult. From May to Oc­to­ber, it rises to $100 a family/$40 an adult. Go to park­saus­tralia.gov.au/kakadu to book. PACK MOZZIE RE­PEL­LENT Mosquitoes and flies come with the ter­ri­tory in Aus­tralia’s largest na­tional park, and they can be relentless. Mostly, mozzies pester you at dawn and dusk, so pack en­vi­ron­men­tally friendly spray and cit­ronella can­dles. Take an an­ti­sep­tic gel for in­sect bites, sun­screen, wa­ter and, if travelling in­de­pen­dently, an emer­gency bea­con, 4WD re­pair kit and UHF ra­dio.

STOCK UP ON FOOD IN DAR­WIN

If you’re an in­de­pen­dent trav­eller and don’t want to eat out ev­ery night, then stock up on gro­ceries in Dar­win. You’ll have ac­cess to a larger range of sup­plies at bet­ter prices.

LEAVE YOUR DRONE AT HOME

It’s for­bid­den to send up a drone un­less you have a per­mit from Parks Aus­tralia – and it’s not easy to ob­tain one.

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