GREEN IS IN

THERE’S A WAY TO CHOOSE FASH­ION THAT MAKES YOU FEEL AS GOOD AS YOU LOOK

Life & Style Weekend - - MAGAZINE | FASHION - WORDS: AM­BER MAC P HER SON

In the world of fash­ion, sus­tain­abil­ity is so hot right now. But re­spon­si­ble con­sumerism isn’t just an­other fad. The Iconic rep­re­sen­ta­tive Jaana Quain­tance-james says it’s a move­ment that’s here to stay.

“Since the Rana Plaza fac­tory collapse in 2013, brands and con­sumers have be­come in­creas­ingly aware of the impacts of fash­ion and want to know they are not in­volved in those neg­a­tive impacts,” Jaana says.

“We are all col­lec­tively so much more aware of the sig­nif­i­cance of the so­cial and environmen­tal con­cerns that we face glob­ally, which is driv­ing greater im­per­a­tive to act.”

If you’re look­ing to slow down your fast fash­ion ad­dic­tion, Jaana says it’s im­por­tant to know how you de­fine sus­tain­able and eth­i­cal fash­ion to fit your own val­ues.

“What qual­i­fies as eth­i­cal or sus­tain­able can mean dif­fer­ent things to dif­fer­ent peo­ple,” she says.

“At The Iconic we de­fine sus­tain­able and eth­i­cal fash­ion as re­lat­ing to mak­ing de­ci­sions to use ma­te­ri­als or pro­cesses that are bet­ter for hu­mans, an­i­mals or the en­vi­ron­ment than con­ven­tional al­ter­na­tives.

“If you are con­cerned about environmen­tal is­sues, look out

for brands us­ing sus­tain­able ma­te­ri­als or those which have spe­cific environmen­tal cer­ti­fi­ca­tions.

“If you are an an­i­mal lover, seek out brands that use ve­gan ma­te­ri­als with an­i­mal test­ing-free cer­ti­fi­ca­tions or non-mulesed wool.”

If you’re think­ing sus­tain­able fash­ion is all linen over­alls and hemp jumpers, pre­pare to eat your hat.

The Iconic re­cently launched Con­sid­ered, a col­lec­tion of la­bels that have re­spon­si­ble prac­tices at the fore­front.

“A key driver for us in launch­ing our new Con­sid­ered edit came about be­cause we saw a huge op­por­tu­nity to de­bunk the myth that sus­tain­able fash­ion is ex­pen­sive, un­fash­ion­able and in­ac­ces­si­ble,” Jaana says.

“A sim­ple browse through The Iconic Con­sid­ered edit clearly show­cases the di­ver­sity of brands, price points and high-fash­ion, trend-driven styles that are avail­able to cus­tomers seek­ing to make more con­scious fash­ion pur­chases.”

Jaana says the best way to start your jour­ney to sus­tain­able and eth­i­cal fash­ion choices is to do your re­search on your favourite brands.

“Con­sumers need to in­form them­selves about what ‘good’ looks like, look­ing be­yond the black and white rat­ing sys­tems which pro­vide a sub­jec­tive view,” she says.

“Once you have an in­formed per­spec­tive, take ac­tion and tell that brand what you think about how they are do­ing – whether it’s good or bad – and celebrate progress when it is made.

“A lot of peo­ple ex­pect per­fec­tion in this area and it’s im­por­tant to keep in mind that may not ac­tu­ally be at­tain­able.”

Look 1: The Iconic Mac­graw Pink Sheer Shirt, $695, Feather Drum Pink Pants, $165

Look 2: The Iconic Lee Matthews Yel­low Shirt, $349,

Ro­mance Was Born Pleat Skirt, $595, Peo­ple Tree Bunny Tee, $90

Look 3: The Iconic Christo­pher Es­ber Green Dress, $690, Christo­pher Es­ber Satin Pants, $690, Dr Martens San­dals, $179

All from the­iconic.com.au

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.