WAKE UP LIKE THIS

LOOK­ING TO SAVE FACE WITH PER­MA­NENT MAKE-UP? HERE ARE THE THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW FIRST

Life & Style Weekend - - MAGAZINE | YOU / WELLBEING - WORDS: AM­BER MACPHERSON

Imag­ine wak­ing up with flaw­less eye­brows every day, arched and filled in be­fore you’ve even washed your face. Imag­ine. It’s a dream that’s come to re­al­ity in re­cent years with tat­tooed make-up one of the fastest-grow­ing cos­metic pro­ce­dures in the beauty in­dus­try.

Amy Jean Brow Agency Queensland direc­tor Monique Deveney says per­ma­nent make-up has come a long way in re­cent years — less etched black cater­pil­lars a la great aunt Brenda, more sub­tle im­prove­ments to your fea­tures.

“You can now have cos­metic tat­too­ing for brow, lip and eye­liner and leave the treat­ment look­ing and feel­ing like your­self with a look that is not rel­e­vant to trend and won’t date,” Monique says.

“The phi­los­o­phy is to sub­tly en­hance rather than stamp or feel over­done and blocky like yes­ter­year. Clients en­joy the con­ve­nience of wak­ing up with min­i­mal ef­fort re­quired.”

Feather tat­too­ing on eye­brows is one pro­ce­dure that’s ad­vanced in leaps and bounds — small strokes of ink that ap­pear as ex­tra eye­brow hairs.

Rather than sport­ing an eternal cat­eye, tat­tooed eye­liner fills in the gaps be­tween eyelashes for a less-is-more look. And lip tat­too make-up aug­ments your nat­u­ral lip colour with a slightly darker pig­ment.

Amy Jean has taken eye­brow tat­too­ing one step fur­ther with its Mist Brow tech­nique.

“Mist­ing is a process where we air­brush fine pix­i­lated dots of or­ganic pig­ment into the outer lay­ers of the skin,” Monique says. “We create your ideal shape and add deeper colours for an om­bre ef­fect where de­sired.”

While the pro­ce­dure is called per­ma­nent or tat­tooed make-up, the looks last be­tween a year and 18 months for eye­brows and three to five years for lips and eye­liner.

Ses­sions can cost be­tween $300 to $800 or more so it’s worth doing your re­search for that rea­son alone.

“Book a con­sul­ta­tion (with your make-up tat­tooist) and ask to view pre­vi­ous client re­sults,” Monique says.

“There are many vis­ual plat­forms such as In­sta­gram and Facebook that will show­case the artist’s work.

“It is also im­por­tant to en­sure you feel connected and con­fi­dent in es­tab­lish­ing your de­sired out­come — af­ter all, this is your face.

“Ask how many years they have been op­er­at­ing as a cos­metic tat­too artist, their qual­i­fi­ca­tions and whether the sa­lon is a mem­ber of the As­so­ci­a­tion Cos­metic Tat­too in Aus­tralia (ACTA) or The So­ci­ety of Per­ma­nent Cos­metic Pro­fes­sion­als (SPCP) glob­ally. Un­for­tu­nately, the in­dus­try is not heav­ily reg­u­lated and some artists are open­ing busi­nesses af­ter doing a two-day work­shop with no un­der­stand­ing of the anatomy of an eye­brow.”

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