SPRING INTO AC­TION

FROM KEEP­ING A FOOD DIARY TO CHANG­ING YOUR SNACK STRAT­EGY, TH­ESE FIVE SIM­PLE STEPS WILL KICK-START YOUR WEIGHT-LOSS GOALS

Life & Style Weekend - - MAGAZINE | WELLBEING - KELLY REN­NIE Kelly is a per­sonal trainer, mother and au­thor of Busy Mum Syn­drome. She spe­cialises in online train­ing pro­grams for busy mums, which have earned praise from Kate Mid­dle­ton. READ MORE AT busy­mum­fit­ness.com

When the weather warms up we nat­u­rally start to think about los­ing weight. With sum­mer just around the cor­ner, we want to make sure we can still fit into the shorts and dresses from the year be­fore.

For­tu­nately for us, spring is a great time to be­gin (and stick to) a healthy eat­ing plan. Here are five ways to make it your health­i­est sea­son yet.

1. START A HERB GAR­DEN

Everybody should have a herb gar­den. Herbs are easy to grow, re­quire only a small amount of care and of­fer a cheap, sustainabl­e way to add va­ri­ety to your healthy meals.

Even a small se­lec­tion grown on a win­dowsill can add flavour to food, al­low­ing you to use less salt and other ad­di­tives. Don’t dis­count their nu­tri­tional value, ei­ther.

Herbs such as oregano, basil, and pars­ley con­tains tons of an­tiox­i­dants, help­ing pro­tect against cell dam­age and in­flam­ma­tion.

2. STAY HY­DRATED

An old-fash­ioned but ex­tremely valu­able piece of ad­vice is to drink a glass of water be­fore eat­ing a meal. The sen­sa­tions we feel for hunger and thirst are of­ten in­dis­tin­guish­able and it can be easy to mis­take one for the other.

Some­times con­stant overeat­ing is just an in­di­ca­tor that we are not drinking enough liq­uid over­all, and our bod­ies are try­ing to com­pen­sate for it. Par­tic­u­larly now that the weather is warm­ing up, en­sure you are drinking enough water at the right times of the day to fuel your body.

3. EAT YOUR VEG­ETA­BLES IN THE MORN­ING

It’s time to ditch the syrup-cov­ered pan­cakes or sug­ary ce­re­als. By switch­ing to a savoury break­fast there are many more op­tions to eat well.

Think eggs, fruits, veg­eta­bles and whole­grains — fresh, un­pro­cessed foods that are full of vi­tal vi­ta­mins and min­er­als, not to men­tion fi­bre, which will help to keep you full and avoid any dis­tract­ing hunger pangs mid­morn­ing.

Switch­ing to a health­ier break­fast also makes it far eas­ier to meet your daily quota of veg­eta­bles. Even vegie left­overs from the night be­fore are a fan­tas­tic op­tion for a morn­ing snack.

4. WAIT FIVE MIN­UTES

An un­be­liev­ably sim­ple trick that can help you avoid snack­ing on junk food is to wait five min­utes be­fore eat­ing it.

The temp­ta­tion to con­sume sweets, choco­late and other un­healthy foods is of­ten just a fleet­ing im­pulse that we have trained our­selves to act upon im­me­di­ately.

By tak­ing a step back and do­ing some­thing else be­fore eat­ing it you are putting space be­tween yourself and in­stant grat­i­fi­ca­tion. Of­ten the crav­ing will dis­ap­pear on its own.

5. KEEP A FOOD DIARY

Re­cent stud­ies sug­gest that women who record their eat­ing, drinking and train­ing habits are five to 10 per cent more likely to achieve weight loss.

Get­ting into the rou­tine of track­ing your con­sump­tion and even cre­at­ing a vis­ual food diary will train your brain to think dif­fer­ently about food.

It will pro­vide you with the opportunit­y to break out of the cy­cle of bad habits and to build new ones based on sound nu­tri­tional prin­ci­ples.

EYE WELL­NESS

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.