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A PAD­DLE POP AF­TER A SWIM, MUNCHING ON FAIRY BREAD AT A PARTY AND AL­WAYS WEAR­ING THONGS. YOU KNOW YOU GREW UP IN AUS­TRALIA WHEN …

Life & Style Weekend - - MAGAZINE | OUR SAY -

DAVE

YOU know you grew up in Aus­tralia when … No hat, no play was your life mantra. Never eat soggy Weet-bix means some­thing to you. You still re­mem­ber one three, dou­ble 0, six triple five, 0, six.

You learnt to line dance to nut­bush city lim­its in pri­mary school.

Watch­ing Satur­day Dis­ney and want­ing the gi­ant prize stash so bad.

How good was the book fair and free-dress day. Only re­al­is­ing as an adult that the games teach­ers made you play in pri­mary school were to keep you silent: Dead Fish, Heads Down Thumbs Up and Sleep­ing Lions.

The yearly home de­liv­ery of the big yel­low book called, wait for it … the Yel­low Pages! The only way you made a de­ci­sion at school was to en­grave “yes” and “no” on to your eraser and throw it on the desk.

Turn­ing six lines in to a su­per­man S was the best. Get­ting a pen li­cence in Year 5.

Fairy bread was a party sta­ple.

More Milo in the glass than milk. Crunch­ing down on dry two-minute noo­dles with sea­son­ing, of course.

You felt re­ally su­per-rich de­posit­ing $2 into your Dol­lar­mite ac­count.

The kid with rollups in their lunch box ev­ery day was the king­pin of the school.

If your kid cur­rency wasn’t tazos, were you even a kid?

Be­fore Spo­tify, we dis­cov­ered mu­sic on the So Fresh Al­bums or Limewire. Tuck­shop day was the best day ever. Se­ri­ously, grow­ing up in Aus­tralia was pretty cool.

Good on ya, Straya!

SAM

I GREW up in the ’80s when Bondy helped us win the Amer­ica’s Cup and when Crocodile Dundee was the big­gest movie play­ing at the Ma­roochy­dore cin­ema. You would hire the VHS player along with your videos in­clud­ing Road House and Big Trou­ble In Lit­tle China from Rain­bow Video, only to find out that they put BETA tapes in your plas­tic bag, which meant you had to go back.

Then on the way home, you would stop in at Mac­cas, go past the kids hav­ing birth­day din­ner in the buses in­side the store, be­fore leav­ing with your poly­styrene con­tain­ers brim­ming with beefy, cheesy good­ness.

We had no no­tion of kilo­joules, Killer­jules or what­ever they are. Dad would be on his third stubby and mum would be in the kitchen prep­ping for the week­end’s beach snacks, which would in­vari­ably get turfed in favour of hot chips wrapped in news­pa­per.

Which, let’s be hon­est is far more sat­is­fy­ing af­ter three hours of beach cricket where you only got to bat twice be­cause the seven play­ers you started with grew to nearly 30 by lunchtime and sev­eral of whom did not ad­here to the golden rule: you can’t bat if you don’t field and you cer­tainly can’t go from bat to bowl. We were and still very much are the “lucky coun­try”. Maybe it’s be­cause we live here on the Sun­shine Coast we are a lit­tle shel­tered from the world’s woes, but I like to think it is be­cause of our com­mu­nity.

You only have to look at the re­cent fire events in Pere­gian to see how much this com­mu­nity bands to­gether and stands as one. I am glad I grew up here and prouder to see my daugh­ter do the same …

ASH

YOU knew you grew up in Aus­tralia when … You lived on a farm in Palm­woods and you used to have the best fun, rid­ing around on your dad’s knee on the trac­tor.

My brother and I be­lieve we had the best child­hood. Born and bred here, we had the best of both worlds.

We lived on an avo­cado farm on Hunchy Rd, iand we used to help pick the fruit from the three acres (1.2ha) of land.

Then we’d pack­age them up and sell them out the front in our home­made fruit stall (we used to get so ex­cited when some­one would stop by to grab some sup­plies). Grow­ing up on the farm was so much fun. We used to see wildlife — in fact, so much of it used to make its way into our house! On one oc­ca­sion, we had just fin­ished watch­ing the Steve Ir­win show — The Crocodile Hunter and as the cred­its were rolling, a big python slith­ered un­der the door and went be­hind the TV cab­i­net. My brother and I got so scared (seven and five years old at the time) and sat on top of the din­ing room ta­ble un­til the snake catcher came to re­trieve the snake.

Then, a few months later, we had an­other in­ci­dent. This time it was with the bats which used to live in the palm trees out the back. But, this one night in par­tic­u­lar, a bat flew into our house and then it dis­ap­peared, so we thought it must have flown back out. A week later, my pop came over to mea­sure some cur­tains for my mum.

And as he went to flick the cur­tain to start mea­sur­ing it, a big scary bat flew up from the cur­tain rod that it was hang­ing on.

It had been in our house for over a week.

TUNE IN FOR DAVE, SAM AND ASH ON HOT 91.1 ON WEEK­DAYS FOR BREAK­FAST FROM 5.30AM.

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