WHAT IS SAD­FISH­ING?

WHEN YOU CAN'T GET AT­TEN­TION AND YOU USE THIS SICK TREND, IT’S ENOUGH TO MAKE ANY­ONE UN­HAPPY – FOR NO GOOD REA­SON

Life & Style Weekend - - MAGAZINE| WELLBEING - WORDS: MELISSA SHEDDEN – www.whimn.com.au

If you’ve been on the in­ter­net you might yet.have seen a video of Ken­dall Jen­ner wear­ing a white T-shirt, star­ing into the cam­era with an earnest ex­pres­sion ready to share her heart­break in her “most raw story”

Un­der­neath the post her mum, Kris, has writ­ten ‘I’m so proud of my dar­ling @Ken­dall­jen­ner for be­ing so brave and vul­ner­a­ble. Make sure to watch Ken­dall’s Twit­ter on Sun­day night to find out what I’m talk­ing about and be pre­pared to be moved.’

Was Ken­dall go­ing to ad­dress her cul­tural ap­pro­pri­a­tion on shoots? Was she go­ing to share her own #Metoo story? Or per­haps open up about her fa­ther’s tran­si­tion to Cait­lyn?

No, she was launch­ing a new cam­paign with the pim­ple brand Proac­tiv. Ken­dall and Kris Jen­ner sad­fished us all.

Sad­fish­ing is a term be­ing used to de­scribe a sit­u­a­tion when some­one posts about an emo­tional prob­lem to at­tract at­ten­tion, sym­pa­thy or hook an au­di­ence. It’s gen­er­ally done by celebs for pub­lic­ity, but you’ve seen this sort of woe-is-me be­hav­iour on Face­book by us reg­u­lar folk, too.

When some­one up­dates their sta­tus to: “you think you know some­one.” Or “so done with this” that’s sad­fish­ing.

In­flu­encers and blog­gers sad­fish, too, post­ing some­thing pretty and talk­ing about how mis­er­able they are, ready for the in­ter­net to open their arms. Watch and they’ll be called “strong” and “brave” and thanked for their “hon­esty”.

But the mes­sage is clear: like bikini pics, be­ing sad makes you pop­u­lar and gets you seen.

The prob­lem with this is be­ing high­lighted in a new UK re­port from on­line well­be­ing agency Dig­i­tal Aware­ness UK. It shows teens fac­ing gen­uine dis­tress are seek­ing sup­port on­line and rather than get it, are be­ing ac­cused of just look­ing for at­ten­tion.

The re­port comes at the same time Vichealth and Swin­burne Univer­sity of Tech­nol­ogy re­vealed more than half of young Aus­tralians felt lonely some­times or al­ways, a tragic statis­tic.

Yes, we need to talk about men­tal ill­ness and not be­ing fine 100 per cent of the time, but do we re­ally need to do it with fil­ters and crocodile tears act­ing as cheek high­lighter?

Shar­ing gen­uine dis­tress is im­por­tant but shar­ing a glossy, highly fil­tered ver­sion of sad­ness, is just plain sad.

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