Re-dream­ing the fu­ture

A sweet re­minder of how our own thoughts and emo­tions are what take us to the bot­tom of the ocean and, no mat­ter how dark it gets, it’s good to re­mem­ber that this is a sup­port­ive uni­verse and there’s beauty and magic ev­ery­where. Words and photos by Jena

Living Now - - Editorial - by Jena Grif­fiths

A sweet re­minder of how our own thoughts and emo­tions are what take us to the bot­tom of the ocean and, no mat­ter how dark it gets, it’s good to re­mem­ber that this is a sup­port­ive uni­verse and there’s beauty and magic ev­ery­where.

HERE’S A BUNCH of sea daisies for you, a frag­ile gift of hope from Aus­tralia’s Great Bar­rier Reef. I took this close-up pho­to­graph of liv­ing coral in July, near Cairns, af­ter mak­ing a spe­cial trip out there to go see for my­self. ( The last time I dived in this re­gion was in New Cale­do­nia 18 years ago.)

We are con­stantly bom­barded with ter­ri­ble news about the state of our planet, and while, yes, we do need to take ur­gent ac­tion, we also need to be mind­ful of what vi­sion of the fu­ture we breathe life into. I choose a fu­ture where we pre­serve our beau­ti­ful blue planet and all life on it.

On this note, have you seen Brad Bird’s new film called To­mor­row­land? If not, I urge you to see it, and tell ev­ery­one else to see it too. Hol­ly­wood has al­ways been a barom­e­ter of our col­lec­tive zeit­geist, and this im­por­tant new film in­di­cates that, at last, the col­lec­tive tide is turn­ing. I’m re­ally happy that Dis­ney backed it, be­cause it echoes the spirit of Walt Dis­ney who once said, “If you can dream it, you can do it”.

How re­al­ity works is a dif­fi­cult con­cept, even for sci­en­tists who ad­mit that they don’t yet have all or even half the jig­saw pieces. Al­ready 80 years have past since Aus­trian quan­tum physi­cist Er­win Schrödinger gave us “Schrödinger’s cat” to ex­plain how (or how not) thoughts or ex­pec­ta­tions in­flu­ence fu­ture out­comes. To­mor­row­land is an ad­mirable at­tempt by Dis­ney writer/di­rec­tor Brad Bird to ex­plain to the masses, with­out preach­ing, the im­por­tance of each of us hold­ing the right vi­sion, plus act­ing on our vi­sions, in or­der to im­pact on fu­ture re­al­ity.

What has this to do with frag­ile sea daisies?

Each of us has to do the work, alone and col­lec­tively, of man­ag­ing our own thoughts and emo­tions, and of hold­ing a pos­i­tive vi­sion of the fu­ture and act­ing ac­cord­ingly.

The ques­tion is: ‘How can we ac­tu­ally do the work of re-cal­i­brat­ing our thoughts and emo­tions on a daily ba­sis?’

The sea daisies are here to re­mind you of how our own thoughts and emo­tions are what take us to the bot­tom of the ocean. These tiny daisies are my gift to you, to re­mind you that, no mat­ter how dark it gets, or how ex­treme the pres­sure, this is a sup­port­ive uni­verse and there’s beauty and magic ev­ery­where. We just have to no­tice it. n

Jena Grif­fiths lives in Switzer­land and teaches and con­sults in­ter­na­tion­ally. She is a cer­ti­fied master hand an­a­lyst ded­i­cated to help­ing peo­ple see their own depth and beauty and find their way. She also has de­grees in psy­chol­ogy, ge­og­ra­phy and ed­u­ca­tion. Jena teaches pro­fes­sional hand anal­y­sis cour­ses on how to read life pur­pose from fin­ger­prints.

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