The power of touch

Mas­sage pro­vides the pa­tient with no­tice­able, pos­i­tive phys­i­cal re­sponses as well as psy­cho­log­i­cal.

Living Now - - Contents - by Rob Lo­bosco

Mas­sage pro­vides the pa­tient with no­tice­able, pos­i­tive phys­i­cal re­sponses as well as psy­cho­log­i­cal.

Mas­sage as a health prac­tice has proven to be an ex­cel­lent ad­junct to other modes of ther­apy, as well as to pro­mote bet­ter re­cov­ery af­ter ill­ness, surgery and ex­er­cise in­juries.

Mas­sage as­sists ve­nous re­turn, i.e., the cir­cu­la­tion of blood from the body back to the heart. As well as that, it as­sists the mus­cles in the re­moval of meta­bolic wastes, fa­cil­i­tat­ing the re­moval of tox­ins due to ex­ces­sive mus­cu­lar ac­tiv­ity. Freud, Re­ich and Perls all un­der­stood that touch has a psy­chother­a­peu­tic ef­fect be­yond sim­ple sup­port and re­lax­ation.

The sim­ple act of touch dur­ing a mas­sage deeply af­fects the client’s bodily be­ing and sense of self. The body, mind and spirit are all one. When you are touched dur­ing a mas­sage, heal­ing is oc­cur­ring at ev­ery level, i.e., phys­i­cal, men­tal and spir­i­tual level.

For mas­sage to have a last­ing ef­fect it must be used in con­junc­tion with a healthy diet, ad­e­quate rest, reg­u­lar ex­er­cise and pos­i­tive men­tal at­ti­tude.

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