Motor (Australia)

RTR FORD MUSTANG SPEC3

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SOME PHONE CALLS are better than others. “Scotty, would you like to test drive a Ford Mustang that’s purpose-built to go sideways?” Yes, yes I would.

Vaughn Gittin Jr isn’t a household name in Australia but he’s a big deal in the world of modified Fords in the United States. He is also one of the world’s leading exponents of sideways driving, being a two-time Formula Drift champion and three-time World Drift Series champion.

His brand, RTR Vehicles, offers a range of products for the Mustang, F-150 and Ranger, while also having a major role in projects like Ken Block’s Hoonicorn Mustang and the Ford Mustang Mach-E 1400 concept. This RTR gear is now available in Australia courtesy of Mustang Motorsport and it threw us the keys to its Spec 3 example for a taste.

The RTR offering starts at Spec 1, which includes a full bodykit (upper and lower grille with LED lights, chin spoiler, side skirts, rear spoiler), lowered springs, a choice of 19-inch wheel designs and a bunch of tidbits like badging, a signed dash plaque and shift knob (manual only). This pack starts at $13,000 fitted.

Spec 2 is an extra $6500 and includes all the aforementi­oned plus staggered 20-inch rims wearing 275/35 rubber up front and 305/30 at the rear, adjustable anti-roll bars and adjustable dampers for non-MagneRide cars.

Last but certainly not least, the Spec 3 cherry on top is the addition of a Ford Performanc­e supercharg­er that lifts outputs from the standard 339kW/556Nm to 559kW/908Nm, though it’ll decrease your bank account by a further $21,500. The supercharg­er comes with a five-year/100,000km warranty and the package is seven-state ADR compliant.

All up, including the donor car, you’re looking at around $110,000 – a lotta money for a Mustang, but cheap for a 559kW two-door coupe and it does look the part.

RTR’s signature Aero wheels split opinion, but a set of more convention­al 14-spoke ‘Tech’ alloys are available.

The signature LED grille lights are a cool touch, but it’s the other end of the car that garners the most attention. This thing is LOUD. James from Mustang Motorsport tells me when returning the car that the exhaust’s Quiet mode is still available, knowledge that my neighbours would have appreciate­d during some early morning starts.

While the RTR’s chassis upgrades are actually the main event here, let’s start with the monster under the bonnet. Ever since the 2018 upgrade, the Mustang GT’s 5.0-litre V8 has been somewhat fickle when it comes to being supercharg­ed. Early examples, even of the official Ford-backed Roush kit, left a bit to be desired in terms of response and driveabili­ty, but happily in its latest evolution all the bugs have been ironed out.

It obviously goes like the clappers, with a furious appetite for revs, especially with the closely stacked ratios of our test car’s

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 ?? ?? ABOVE Latest supercharg­er tune quells many of the foibles we’ve come across in the past
LEFT Monstrous outputs will spin wheels in fourth. Best have your wits about you!
ABOVE Latest supercharg­er tune quells many of the foibles we’ve come across in the past LEFT Monstrous outputs will spin wheels in fourth. Best have your wits about you!
 ?? ?? BELOW Adjustable anti-roll bars and dampers are available on nonsuperch­arged ‘Spec 2’ builds
BELOW Adjustable anti-roll bars and dampers are available on nonsuperch­arged ‘Spec 2’ builds

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