NT News

WE ALL WANNA BE PROUD WALLABIES

- NATHANIEL CHAMBERS

CLASSIC Wallabies and Wallaroos have given Darwin schools a taste of their success and engaged with the rugby community as part of Australia’s bid to host the 2027 World Cup.

The trio of Digby Ioane, Radike Samo and Shirley Russell have dived into the clinics held at Rugby Park, Mackillop College and Wulagi School to teach skills.

And through these clinics and the potential of hosting the 2027 showpiece, the Classic Wallabies are hoping to form a legacy that grows the game at community and grassroots level. The World Cup bid has already gained plenty of support and any fans looking to get on board should visit Australia2­027.rugby.

“It’s pretty surreal coming back to the Territory because I spent nine years playing and coaching up here,” Russell said.

“Rugby Australia has put in a bid for the 2027 World Cup and with that there will be a legacy left around the country with all the internatio­nal sides giving back to grassroots rugby.”

Ioane, who played his last Test for the

Wallabies in 2013, played across the world in his career, but back in Australia he is doing what he loves – inspiring kids.

And he showed his competitiv­e side hasn’t died down in retirement at Mackillop, where he scored two tries.

“It will be a dream to get 2027. I was still in school when we last had the World Cup (in 2003),” Ioane said.

“Even though we lost the final it’s always great to see your heroes and another (World Cup) in 2027 will be a massive boost. We’re living it up in Darwin coaching kids and sharing knowledge.”

 ??  ?? Classic Wallaby Radike Samo and Classic Wallaroo Shirley Russell at a rugby clinic at Mackillop Catholic College. Picture: Julianne Osborne
Classic Wallaby Radike Samo and Classic Wallaroo Shirley Russell at a rugby clinic at Mackillop Catholic College. Picture: Julianne Osborne

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