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Rusty Rabbit digs the best kind of hole

Celebrated writer Gen Urobuchi on finally tackling action with this bunny jumper

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Chewing on a carrot as though it’s a cigar, old soul and “shitty father” Stamp the bunny has already stolen our heart. He stars in Rusty Rabbit, an intriguing exploratio­n platformer that’s being written by Gen Urobuchi, the award-winning mind behind the likes of Psycho-Pass and Fate/Zero. A metroidvan­ia starring mech-piloting rabbits is certainly different, but it’s a project that’s bunny-hopped up our most wanted list.

We had to know more about this badass little creature, so at Tokyo Game Show we tracked down the writer himself, as well as producer Yuichiro Saito from publisher NetEase Games.

Rusty Rabbit is set far in the future, over a millennium after humans abandoned the planet and rabbits took their rightful place at the top of the food chain. Trying to make sense of the abandoned space elevators and factories they left behind, Stamp has obsessivel­y tinkered with mechs and machines in the hope of understand­ing what happened in the past, and where all the humans went. His work has come at a cost, leading him to neglect his family and even driving his own daughter to up and leave, disowning him in the process. Falling even further into his work, he finds a D-TAM storage terminal that not only offers him answers but also sets him on track to find his missing daughter. And that’s just the beginning.

FAMILY PROBLEMS

The game is split into two sections. Abovegroun­d in Stamp’s home village you can speak to other rabbits in the local bar, buy items, and upgrade your mech. When prepped, he can venture below, where the game takes the shape of a sidescroll­ing metroidvan­ia where you fight machines and use your ever-evolving mech to find more D-TAMs, parts and, perhaps, leads as to the fate of both your daughter and humankind.

It’s a surprising collaborat­ion for Urobuchi’s Nitroplus and NetEase. For all of his visual novel, TV, and movie exploits, he’s never made an action game, nor has he made anything like this in which cute bunnies are the stars. And so we had to ask: why rabbits?

“On Twitter, a user called @almighty04­04 would make different vignettes using Sylvanian Family dolls,” explains Urobuchi, before grabbing his phone to reveal a picture of a rabbit doll with a pipe in its mouth and a rusted mecha suit in the background. ‘I was so fascinated by it that I made it my wallpaper on my phone. Slowly I began to imagine a backstory for this character and story and what it would

Rabbit society will comically represent a lot of issues our society is currently facing.

 ?? ?? Right to left: Yuichiro Saito, adorable mechobsess­ed bunny Stamp, and Gen Urobuchi.
Right to left: Yuichiro Saito, adorable mechobsess­ed bunny Stamp, and Gen Urobuchi.
 ?? ?? The bar in Stamp’s village is home to some colourful furry characters.
The bar in Stamp’s village is home to some colourful furry characters.

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