All in a Day’s Work

HU­MOUR ON THE JOB

Reader's Digest Asia Pacific - - Front Page -

HARD TO AR­GUE Scene: A sixth-grade class­room. Teacher: “What are the harm­ful en­vi­ron­men­tal ef­fects of oil on fish?” Stu­dent: “When my mum opened a can of sar­dines last night, it was full of oil and all the sar­dines were dead.” Source: go­pher­central.com

BLINK AND YOU MISS IT Tech sup­port: Is the light on your mo­dem blink­ing? Cus­tomer: No. Tech: So it’s solid, then? Cus­tomer: Yes. It’s solid, then it’s off, then it’s solid again, then it’s off again … Source: no­tal­waysright.com

SEMI-PER­MA­NENT I worked in the hu­man re­sources depart­ment of a large ap­parel com­pany where turnover was a big prob­lem.

So while in­ter­view­ing a po­ten­tial em­ployee, one of the ques­tions I had to ask was, “Are you look­ing for per­ma­nent work?”

“Yes,” she replied. “For the time be­ing.” SUB­MIT­TED BY ANNE KING

ON THE NOSE ‘PRN’ is a med­i­cal ab­bre­vi­a­tion of the Latin pro re nata, mean­ing “when nec­es­sary”. Ap­par­ently, some nurses never learned their ab­bre­vi­a­tions.

One day, a se­nior nurse walked into a pa­tient’s room to find a sup­pos­i­tory shoved up his nose. When she con­fronted the younger nurse re­spon­si­ble, the lat­ter ad­mit­ted that she thought PRN stood for “per right nos­tril”. Source: scrub­s­mag.com

IN STITCHES My four-year-old grand­son, Michael, was taken to the emer­gency room af­ter a fall that re­sulted in a cut lip. He ended up need­ing stitches. Fol­low­ing the pro­ce­dure, the doc­tor led Michael over to a mir­ror, hop­ing to re­as­sure him that all was now OK.

Upon see­ing his swollen, stitched face, Michael ex­claimed, “You should have let my grandma do it. She sews bet­ter than you!” SUB­MIT­TED BY MAR­GARET AV­ENUE

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