Dis­ease smell in breath, body odour, and urine

When we get ill, it causes changes such as in the im­mune sys­tem, me­tab­o­lism, and the bi­ol­ogy of the skin, pro­duc­ing spe­cific waste prod­ucts. Some of them make our breath, sweat, or urine smell.

Science Illustrated - - HUMANS -

BREATH DI­A­BET­ICS HAVE ACETONE IN THEIR BREATH

A per­son with un­treated di­a­betes can­not break down car­bo­hy­drates, and as the body lacks nu­tri­tion, it starts to burn fat de­posits, pro­duc­ing free fatty acids, which are con­verted into ke­tones in the liver. In the small air sacs of the lungs (alve­oli), the sub­stances are trans­ferred to the breath, which smells like acetone. The smell could also be an in­di­ca­tion of other dis­eases, by which the body gets too lit­tle nu­tri­tion.

SWEAT HYPERMETABOLISM CHANGES BODY ODOUR

When bac­te­ria and mi­cro­scopic fungi break down sweat and se­bum on the skin, se­cret­ing waste prod­ucts, and BO. Peo­ple with hypermetabolism of­ten sweat more, and al­ler­gies can make the skin’s se­ba­ceous glands se­crete more, so the micro­organ­isms get more nu­tri­tion. When the im­mune sys­tem is im­pacted, the quan­tity of micro­organ­isms on the skin could cause a more pun­gent body odour.

URINE CON­CUS­SION LEAVES EV­I­DENCE IN URINE

Con­cus­sion and in­fec­tions change the make-up of the body’s break­down prod­ucts, prob­a­bly due to the im­mune sys­tem or in­testi­nal bac­te­ria. In the kid­neys, the blood ves­sels pro­duce thou­sands of bun­dles (glomeruli), where the break­down prod­ucts are fil­tered into the uri­nary sys­tem, and con­cen­trated on their way to­wards the ure­thra. In a urine sam­ple, they can be smelled by an elec­tronic nose.

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