TOP 5 LONG­EST AN­I­MAL MI­GRA­TION

Science Illustrated - - NATURE -

Cute lit­tle ro­dents. And tough sea­far­ers. The an­ces­tors of guinea pigs de­fied the un­pre­dictable At­lantic mil­lions of years ago. But their jour­ney can­not be com­pared to anyphaenidae's mi­gra­tion across the world’s three big­gest oceans.

1 ANYPHAENIDAE

DNA has re­vealed that anyphaenidae of the Amau­ro­bioides genus sailed from South Amer­ica to South Africa, on to New Zealand, and back to South Amer­ica, es­tab­lish­ing new pop­u­la­tions on each lo­ca­tion. STEVE KERR

2 NORONHASKINK

The small noronha skink lizard ex­ists on an is­land off the coast of Brazil, but its clos­est rel­a­tives are in Africa. The lizard crossed the At­lantic some 3.3 mil­lion years ago, when the ocean was 2,800 km wide. SHUTTERSTOCK

3 CAVIOMORPHA

Some 40 mil­lion years ago, a small group of ro­dents crossed the At­lantic on their way to South Amer­ica. To­day, their de­scen­dants in­clude caviomorpha and ap­prox­i­mately 242 other fuzzy species. GETTY IM­AGES

4 SOUTH AMER­I­CAN MON­KEYS

Some 40 mil­lion years ago, when a few African mon­keys crossed the At­lantic, the ocean was 1,700 km wide in the nar­row­est place. They might have taken the long swim along with the an­ces­tors of guinea pigs. SHUTTERSTOCK

5 GALÁ­PA­GOS TOR­TOISE

A few mil­lion years ago, the huge Galá­pa­gos tor­toise trav­elled from South Amer­ica to the Galá­pa­gos Is­lands. And it prob­a­bly did not use a raft. Tor­toises are sturdy enough to float on the ocean for months. WILLEM KOLVOORT/NATUREPL

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.