How ex­actly do our bones heal? And do punches cause us to lose our... uh...

A frac­tured bone of­ten re­quires weeks or months in a cast, but sub­se­quently, the healed frac­ture is of­ten the strong­est part of the bone.

Science Illustrated - - CONTENTS -

BLOOD FLOWS TO THE FRAC­TURE

When a bone is frac­tured, 1 blood ves­sels in the frac­ture are torn, caus­ing ac­cu­mu­la­tion of blood be­tween the frac­tures.

STEM CELLS GEN­ER­ATE NEW BONE TIS­SUE

Os­teogenic stem cells ar­rive 2 to gen­er­ate new bone tis­sue. At the same time, blood ves­sels join across the frac­ture.

AC­CU­MU­LA­TION OF BLOOD TURNED CARTILAGE

The os­teogenic cells gen­er­ate 3 cartilage- like tis­sue, which will ab­sorb cal­cium salts over a few months, be­com­ing ever harder.

THE BONE HEALS

Af­ter a few months, the 4 frac­ture has healed. Dur­ing the heal­ing pe­riod, the in­jured body part has been kept in check, mak­ing all ex­cept the new bone tis­sue weaker.

A C C U M U L AT I O N OF BLOOD OS­TEOGENIC CELL CARTILAGINOUS TIS­SUE

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