New drugs treat and pre­vent mi­graines

Science Illustrated - - MIGRAINE -

EX­IST­ING DRUGS: OB­STRUCT LIB­ER­A­TION OF PAIN PRO­TEIN

The ex­ist­ing drugs, trip­tans, bind to a sero­tonin re­cep­tor on the nerve fi­bres, pre­vent­ing the nerves from lib­er­at­ing the CGRP pro­tein, hence sooth­ing the pain dur­ing a migraine at­tack.

NEW DRUGS: OB­STRUCT SEN­SORY NERVE RE­CEP­TOR

A new type of drugs known as gepants set­tle in the sen­sory nerve's re­cep­tor for the CGRP pro­tein, so it can­not bind to the nerve. This eases the pain of an acute migraine at­tack.

DISARMS PAIN PRO­TEIN

The fre­manezumab an­ti­body binds to the CGRP pro­tein, so it is in­val­i­dated at the mo­ment it is re­leased from the nerve. This pre­vents new migraine at­tacks from de­vel­op­ing.

BINDS TO THE SEN­SORY NERVE

Erenumab, an­other new an­ti­body, func­tions by rec­og­niz­ing and bind­ing to the CGRP re­cep­tor of the sen­sory nerve, so it can­not be ac­ti­vated by the pro­tein. This pre­vents new migraine at­tacks.

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