CRACK RE­VIVES BAC­TE­RIA

Science Illustrated - - TECHNOLOGY BACTERIA -

Mi­cro­cap­sules with bac­te­ria, cal­cium, and urea (for food) are scat­tered in the con­crete. When the con­crete cracks, and wa­ter seeps in, the cap­sules dis­solve to re­lease the bac­te­ria.

BAC­TE­RIA CAUSE RE­AC­TION

The bac­te­ria bind cal­cium on their sur­faces and ab­sorb urea, which their me­tab­o­lisms split and lib­er­ate as car­bona­ceous car­bon­ate. Cal­cium and car­bon­ate re­act to pro­duce cal­cium car­bon­ate – lime.

LIME FILLS UP HOLES

As long as the bac­te­ria get air and wa­ter, they will re­pro­duce and pro­duce lime. When the en­tire crack has been filled, the bac­te­ria go back to hi­ber­na­tion. Hence, bio-con­crete can save lots of main­te­nance costs.

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