STAY SUN SAFE THIS SUM­MER

NOTH­ING RU­INS SUM­MER LIKE A SUN­BURN. WHILE THE PAIN AND RED­NESS MAY ONLY LAST A FEW DAYS, A BAD SUN­BURN CAN HAVE LONGTERM EF­FECTS THAT WILL LEAVE YOU WISH­ING YOU’D LATHERED UP BET­TER. TRY THESE TIPS FOR AVOID­ING HARM­FUL SUN EX­PO­SURE THIS SUM­MER.

Scout Magazine - - Wellbeing... -

While it’s cer­tainly true that you can get sun­burnt all year ‘round – es­pe­cially when you’re in the snow, thanks to its propen­sity for UV re­flec­tion – here in Queens­land, we tend to spend a lot more time out in the sun dur­ing the sum­mer months, mean­ing we se­ri­ously in­crease our chances of get­ting burned. That’s why it’s so im­por­tant to keep those five sun safety se­crets that the Cancer Coun­cil rec­om­mends – ‘slip, slop, slap, seek and slide’ – front of mind when­ever we’re ex­posed to the sun’s rays.

SLIP…

on some cloth­ing that pro­tects your skin from the sun. Whether it’s a sun shirt in the wa­ter or a longsleeve top on the shore, mak­ing sure that your skin isn’t ex­posed to the UV rays is a sure-fire way to pre­vent sun­burn. Keep the fab­ric light­weight to stay nice and cool, too.

SLOP…

on a pro­tec­tive sun­screen that is SPF30 or higher. The Cancer Coun­cil rec­om­mends reap­ply­ing your sun­screen ev­ery two hours, par­tic­u­larly when you’re sweat­ing, swim­ming or towel dry­ing, while also fol­low­ing their other sun safety tips. SLAP…

on a hat – the broader the brim, the bet­ter! While you should gen­er­ally try to stay out of the sun as much as pos­si­ble, wear­ing a pro­tec­tive hat when you do have to spend time out­doors is a great way to pro­tect not just your face and neck, but your scalp too (an eas­ily for­got­ten area where melanomas are re­port­edly more lethal).

SEEK…

a shady spot if you’re plan­ning on spend­ing the day out­side! Whether it’s un­der one of the enor­mous pine trees that are com­mon on the south­ern end of the Gold Coast or your own beach um­brella, hav­ing a shady spot to re­lax in is a great way to re­duce your risk of sun­burn and over­heat­ing.

SLIDE…

on some sun­nies, but make sure they meet Aus­tralian stan­dards – the sun­glasses must have, at min­i­mum, good UV pro­tec­tion and pro­tec­tion against sun glare. Con­sult the Cancer Coun­cil web­site for a full de­scrip­tion of the Aus­tralian Stan­dard for pro­tec­tive eyewear be­fore you make any pur­chases.

When in doubt, re­fer to the handy Sun­smart app! It will tell you what the UV in­dex – the ul­tra­vi­o­let ra­di­a­tion, said to be the in­vis­i­ble killer that you won’t see or feel – is like for the day and how much sun pro­tec­tion you should use.

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