Ready for dry sum­mer?

Seymour Telegraph - - NEWS - By Al­i­son O’Con­nor and Tara Whit­sted heat.

Sey­mour has ex­pe­ri­enced a dry year and it is only set to get drier lead­ing into the sum­mer months.

Ac­cord­ing to Bureau of Me­te­o­rol­ogy data, Sey­mour had recorded just 390.8 mm of rain­fall so far this year (to Mon­day), more than 200 mm less than its av­er­age rain­fall across a 12-month pe­riod (597 mm).

The district is in line with the rest of the state which is on track to have one of the top 10 dri­est springs since records be­gan in 1900, ac­cord­ing to the bureau’s 2018-19 Sum­mer Out­look.

And it has not only been dry — the weather has rapidly warmed up too, with the re­gion hit­ting 37.5°C on Fri­day — the warm­est day since Fe­bru­ary 7 this year, when the re­gion swel­tered through a 38.6°C day.

There were four con­sec­u­tive days above 30 de­grees last week, with the tem­per­a­tures soar­ing to 31.5°C on Wed­nes­day, 34.7°C on Thurs­day, and 30.9°C on Satur­day, be­fore the tem­per­a­tures re­turned to a much more pleas­ant 26.8°C on Sun­day.

BoM’s long-range fore­cast­ing man­ager An­drew Watkins said con­di­tions had gen­er­ally been quite dry through­out the state and it was likely to see a hot­terthan-nor­mal sum­mer pe­riod.

‘‘It has been par­tic­u­larly warm dur­ing Oc­to­ber — about the sixth warm­est on record,’’ Dr Watkins said.

The sum­mer out­look also showed there was an 80 per cent chance of ex­ceed­ing nor­mal tem­per­a­tures in the next three months.

❝It has been par­tic­u­larly warm dur­ing Oc­to­ber — about the sixth warm­est on record . . . Sum­mer in Aus­tralia typ­i­cally brings hot tem­per­a­tures for many com­mu­ni­ties and the out­look in­di­cates this sum­mer will be no dif­fer­ent.❞

‘‘Sum­mer in Aus­tralia typ­i­cally brings hot tem­per­a­tures for many com­mu­ni­ties and the out­look in­di­cates this sum­mer will be no dif­fer­ent,’’ he said.

Dr Watkins said it was also look­ing like El Nin˜ o would come into play with the chance of an El Nin˜ o form­ing in 2018 sit­ting at 70 per cent, roughly triple the nor­mal risk.

Ac­cord­ing to the Bureau, an El Nin˜ o typ­i­cally brings drier and warmer con­di­tions to east­ern Aus­tralia but the rain­fall ef­fects tend to be less pro­nounced in the south dur­ing sum­mer months.

BoM’s long-range fore­cast­ing man­ager An­drew Watkins Chill­ing out: Seven-year-old Jye Hamill knows how to cool off in the

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