Shepparton News

Tackling attachment is tough sport

- Tyler Maher tyler.maher@sheppnews.com.au Tyler Maher is sports editor at McPherson Media Group.

I come to wonder sometimes if I am beginning to reap what I have sown with my threeyear-old daughter Eden.

We are currently experienci­ng some wonderfull­y exuberant attachment issues — that is to say, anything I do must be done within eyeshot or earshot of her or she becomes almost impossible to reason with.

It is a phase I imagine every child goes through, but upon reflection I feel like I may have made it a tad worse.

Just a smidge. Maybe just slightly more moderately than a shade.

Okay, I made it much worse.

Around the time Eden was born — and seemingly throughout every sleep regression or bout of illness where night became day and day became a haze — there was a bevy of internatio­nal sporting events to keep a restless toddler and her parent occupied, and even entertaine­d.

Naturally, I put my hand up for night shift duties.

The 2018 World Cup intertwine­d with the usual European sporting summer of tennis, cricket, cycling and golf.

A thrilling 2019 Cricket World Cup came later, but in between the Big Bash provided a different angle.

First-innings run surges would end around bedtime, so I would snuggle up to my baby as she fell asleep and watch the cricket with her in my arms long after I had to turn the volume up to drown out her snores.

Football was an easy one as well, because if the bedtime routine went past the end of half-time then it was a nice cuddle throughout the third quarter.

Throw in English Premier League action and you can see how Eden and I ‘watched’ almost every sporting event under the sun for the first 18 months of her life.

But then the penny dropped. When I was tired of having to cuddle her to sleep each and every night, breaking that routine was a hellish and exhausting experience that only parents will be able to relate to.

These days the attachment issues come from my inability to say no to those huge puppy-dog eyes. But I must admit, when she goes extended periods of time without turning them on me I feel left out.

Maybe I just want to have my cake and eat it too.

When it comes to the fleeting stages of our children’s lives, is that such a bad thing?

 ?? Picture: AAP/Dean Lewins ?? The tables have turned: Maybe watching late-night sporting events — like Tim Cahill’s World Cup swansong — with Eden in my arms was not a great idea when it came to future attachment issues.
Picture: AAP/Dean Lewins The tables have turned: Maybe watching late-night sporting events — like Tim Cahill’s World Cup swansong — with Eden in my arms was not a great idea when it came to future attachment issues.
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