Smith Journal : 2018-06-04

Opinion : 99 : 97

Opinion

FANCY READING T HE BEST OF SMITH JOURNAL FOR FREE? THINKERS. ADVENTURERS. MAKERS. INVENTORS. or, which means that it cuts through stodgy, fatty foods like roast and potatoes; and thyme is basically the ‘just chuck it in anyway’ herb of cooking. Rosemary is also great for a bit of DIY aromatherapy. Pop a few sprigs in the bath to relax, or make some rosemary tea by adding drieddgdifghisdhgusyi;gus;ghskhfgksehgiu esyrig leaves to hot water (you can do this with thyme too). header header SUBHEADER SUBHEADER SUBHEADER SUB SUB HEADER. Here’s a conspiracy. Generally, what you buy in Australia isn’t actually cinnamon: it’s a similar substance called cassia. It’s from a related tree, but cassia uses the less labour-intensive outer layer of bark, whereas cinnamon uses the inner layer and is then rolled into cigar-like quills. They taste similar too, except cassia is a lot stronger so it’s cheaper for commercial baking. Those cinnamon scrolls from the bakery? Most likely cassia. Ground cinnamon means cassia. Don’t get us wrong – neither is better or worse. It just means that you should be careful of the amounts you are using, as cassia is a lot more potent. Try sprinkling either into your tea or coffee, or on top of yoghurt with a bit of nutmeg and some raisins. They’re lovely in savoury dishes too, especially Asian soup stocks. jfhgk fughdiufgiudfgkudfhgkjdhfkghkjfghkdfjhgk that one’s poisonous, so don’t go getting any DIY ideas here. The crocus flowers in autumn for only two to three weeks, and the flower is only open about two hours a day during this time, normally just before sunrise. When cooking soften the strands in warm water first, and then use that liquid to flavour your food. Once the strands go clear, all of the flavour has seeped out. As for aromatheraThese three are basically conjoined triplets – they all come from the all breeze to live. How romantic.) Oregano goes best with salty things like olives and capers; rosemary is full of camph CREDIT CREDIT CREDIT WORDS If you’re like us, you probably don’t know whether that suspectlooking jar of dried stuff is a container of crushed mint or your last housemate’s lint collection. But herbs have a lot more to offer than just filling up random space in the kitchen cupboard: they make your food tasthgisgisr gih;gh ihg sgihg hghsogh sh e yum, they have some pretty neat therapeutic effects and each contains a little story and mystery all its own. ongues have a bit of a love/ hate relationship with cumin though, as it’s quite strong. Try rubbing a little into your lamb as part of a marinade if you’re afraid to experiment too much. FYI, in the Middle Ages it was thought that if you kept cumin in your pockets it would stop your chickens and lovers from wandering away. Did you read that? Chickens AND lovers. Magic.lzshf;isg ;igiys ig;s yg seiy gsego e’og Claim your free e-mag b y s igning u p t o our e -newsletter h ere: smithjournal.com.au/thegoldenhits or, which means that it cuts through stodgy, fatty foods like roast and potatoes; and thyme is basically the ‘just chuck it in anyway’ herb of cooking. Rosemary is also great for a bit of DIY aromatherapy. Pop a few sprigs in the bath to relax, or make some rosemary tea by adding drieddgdifghisdhgusyi;gus;ghskhfgksehgiu esyrig leaves to hot water (you can do this with thyme too). These three are basically conjoined triplets – they all come from the Mediterranean region, they’re all best used when dried, and they’re all really hard to kill if you’re playing at home. (Rosemary only needs the moisture from khg gihgihgihsdghsdghkdhgkdhgksdhha sea breeze to live. How romantic.) Oregano goes best with salty things like olives and capers; rosemary is full of camph ] 048 / RANT

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