WAR­FARE UR­BAN

> WITH NEW TWIN 106MM TUR­BOS ON A HEMI-HEADED BIG-BLOCK FORD, ROB CAMPISI’S LAT­EST MUS­TANG IS SET TO SMASH SOME RECORDS

Street Machine - - Contents - MARK ARBLASTER

WHEN Syd­ney’s Robert Campisi says he’s build­ing a new car, you’d bet­ter grab a big bag of pop­corn and get ready to watch records tum­ble!

In the world of turbo cars, no­body in Aus­tralia can hold a can­dle to the pi­o­neer­ing ef­forts of Campo. Among a num­ber of very fast cars and nu­mer­ous achieve­ments to his name, Campo was the first to run a five-sec­ond pass in a turbo car in Aus­tralia.

Each of his Ford-pow­ered cre­ations have raised the bar, and his lat­est car – a tubechas­sis wet dream of a Mus­tang built in Syd­ney and pow­ered by a Moran Rac­ing En­gines hemi-headed big-block Ford, good for 5000hp – is about to put his pre­vi­ous mile­stones in the shade.

For the past few years Campo has been on the side­lines fol­low­ing the sale of his twin-turbo Moran-pow­ered 2004 Mus­tang. At the time, the Pro Line 481X was con­sid­ered the lat­est and great­est in the turbo evo­lu­tion. It still is a great com­bi­na­tion, but it wasn’t Campo’s weapon of choice then or now. In­stead, he has stayed with the 670ci hemi-headed cre­ation of Amer­i­can master en­gine builder and tuner, Mike Moran.

“The en­gine is a fan­tas­tic plat­form that is re­ally built for strength and re­li­a­bil­ity,” Campo says. “Sure, the 481X is rated at 5000hp, but there is not one on the planet that is show­ing that power. I have a long his­tory of suc­cess with Moran com­bi­na­tions and the en­gine re­ally only needed a few up­grades to still make it cut­tingedge today.”

The 670-cu­ber launched Rob into the five-sec­ond zone seven years ago, with a [email protected], and he was hold­ing onto the donk just wait­ing for a set of tur­bos that would re­ally bring it alive.

“Those pre­vi­ous Gar­rett 106mm Gen tur­bos were a good deal, but when we ran them in the car we were al­ways look­ing for more power. In the end we were run­ning the mo­tor with the waste­gates shut and it would only make 44psi of boost,” Campo re­calls. “When I sent the mo­tor back to the USA, we dy­noed it with those tur­bos on it in the same con­fig­u­ra­tion, pretty much as we raced it last, and made around 4200hp.

“We knew there were some new-gen­er­a­tion 106s com­ing, so we held off, and when they fi­nally ar­rived those things set the in­ter­net on fire.”

With the new 106mm Gen II GTX5544R snails on board, the en­gine made 5295hp on 70psi boost. That’s im­pres­sive enough, but the torque fig­ure is truly bi­b­li­cal – a whop­ping 3800ft-lb, nearly enough to spin the globe in the other di­rec­tion!

To put that into per­spec­tive, the en­gine makes around the same as four pretty stout, blown

5295HP IS IM­PRES­SIVE ENOUGH, BUT THE TORQUE FIG­URE IS TRULY BI­B­LI­CAL – A WHOP­PING 3800FT-LB, NEARLY ENOUGH TO SPIN THE GLOBE IN THE OTHER DI­REC­TION!

and in­jected big-block Chevs all joined to­gether.

The horse­power gain with those new tur­bos was just in­cred­i­ble and there is still more left in it, ac­cord­ing to Campo. “We did close to 50 pulls on the dyno and it will get fresh­ened by Mike Moran be­fore be­ing sent to Aus­tralia to be fit­ted in the car,” he says. “I would not be sur­prised if we could find an­other 500hp.”

The en­gine runs a bil­let block with a 5.3-inch bore spac­ing fit­ted with a Bryant crank with a 4.25-inch stroke and swing­ing seven-inch GRP al­loy con­rods with Di­a­mond pis­tons, for a static com­pres­sion ra­tio of 12.75:1.

The in­take valve is a mas­sive 55mm and the in­take port flows 660cfm with one-inch of cam lift and 875lb of seat pres­sure with the valve closed. There are only four bolts per cylin­der hold­ing the head on, but the studs are 5/8-inch and torqued to 250ft-lb!

Even the oil­ing sys­tem is a work of art, with a Cnc-ma­chined, bil­let-alu­minium oil pan with an

LET’S JUST SAY THAT AT ONE STAGE WE WERE THE QUICK­EST IN THE WORLD, AND I’D LIKE TO GO BACK TO THAT

in­te­grated Dai­ley seven-stage pump. The block has a three-inch-raised cam tun­nel and runs an 85mm cam with nee­dle roller bear­ings.

The en­gine is fed though a bil­let in­take man­i­fold with 16 5000cc in­jec­tors and a belt­driven Water­man Big Bertha pump sup­ply­ing 44 gal­lons of fuel per minute. A Pro Mag 44 lights the mix and the en­gine is con­trolled by a Bigstuff3 ECU.

“I can’t see the point in go­ing away from this ECU,” Campo says. “Ten years ago there were maybe four good ECUS; now they are pretty much all good, and I couldn’t see ben­e­fits in chang­ing to a Fuel­tech or some­thing like that when this sys­tem is what I know and it gets the job done. It has 500 chan­nels so we will never run out of things to mon­i­tor. Ul­ti­mately, if you can’t tune, it won’t mat­ter what ECU you run.”

Back­ing up the pow­er­plant is a three-speed Lib­erty trans­mis­sion with a Pro­torque con­verter.

The en­gine is im­pres­sive, but so is the car that it’ll be thrown into. Campo put his trust in Syd­ney’s SCF Race Cars to build him a new and im­proved ’Stang. “When it came to in­struc­tions on build­ing a new car, I told SCF’S Craig Burns: ‘I want the lat­est and great­est, do what you need to do, let’s build a bet­ter mouse­trap,’” Campo says. “I left it to him; my only stip­u­la­tion was that it had to be right-hand drive, as that’s what I am used to.”

Un­like the 2004 car, the new ride has gone to a 115-inch wheel­base rather than 109.

The body is one of Mike Moran’s 2014 car­bon­fi­bre Mus­tang moulds, with the rest of the car built from a com­bi­na­tion of car­bon­fi­bre, chrome-moly, ti­ta­nium and all the best stuff. “We are run­ning a sheet-metal rear hous­ing with a Tom’s Dif­fer­en­tials 10-inch crown wheel with 40-spline Mark Wil­liams axles, a 34x17 tyre and Men­scer shocks front and rear,” Campo says.

“Build­ing a car that is af­ford­able to race was as much of a pri­or­ity as any­thing,” he continues. “I’ve heard talk of some sim­i­lar teams at this level spend­ing al­most $100K a year on diff cen­tres as they need to change them ev­ery few passes.”

Asked about his ul­ti­mate goal with the car, Campo was re­luc­tant to put a num­ber on it. “Well, let’s just say that at one stage we were the quick­est in the world, and I’d like to go back to that.”

Given the car is be­ing built to at least run in the 5.30s, the 60-foot time will need to be bet­ter than .90sec, while the 660-foot time has to be in the mid-three-sec­ond zone!

“Horse­power is clearly an ad­van­tage, and we have a few more re­fine­ments to make be­fore I’m happy with the pack­age,” Campo says. “We are cur­rently buzzing the mo­tor to around 9000rpm, and it seems to be a lit­tle heavy on valve springs. Mike is mak­ing some changes at the mo­ment to try and rec­tify that sit­u­a­tion.

“I’d like to think the car will weigh in at around 2500lb,” he continues. “There’s a fair bit of weight in that mo­tor, so we will see.”

With all things go­ing well, the car should hit the track by the end of 2018.

PONY UP: The hemi-headed big-block Ford in Rob’s new Mus­tang was put to­gether by Moran Rac­ing En­gines in the States, and now sports two new 106mm Gar­rett Gen II GTX5544R tur­bos, which helped the donk push out 5295hp on 70psi

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