‘ADULTING’

ALL PEO­PLE ARE ILL-EQUIPPED FOR LIFE AT ONE POINT OR AN­OTHER

Style Magazine - - Lifestyle -

Think back to the day you left school. Most likely, it was a happy oc­ca­sion and cause to cel­e­brate.

Now think back to the first time you pre­pared a job ap­pli­ca­tion, a tax re­turn, or found your­self stranded with a flat tyre.

When con­fronted for the first time with ‘adult things’, and be­ing re­quired to know how to deal with th­ese things, you might have thought to your­self: “I wish they taught me how to do this in school.”

CHANG­ING A TYRE

You may laugh at the thought of a grown per­son not know­ing how to change a tyre.

Then again, you might never have needed to change one be­fore and are un­sure where to place the jack (or how to op­er­ate it).

Be­ing able to change a tyre is an in­valu­able skill, de­spite per­haps be­ing en­ti­tled to road­side as­sis­tance from your in­surer. Find­ing your­self stranded on a re­mote Queens­land road (pos­si­bly even with­out mobile re­cep­tion) need not be a trau­matic ex­pe­ri­ence or un­mit­i­gated dis­as­ter.

RE­CY­CLING

Are you con­fi­dent you know what goes in the re­cy­cling bin, and what doesn’t?

Test your­self: Can you place a clear plas­tic Coke bot­tle in the re­cy­cling bin, in­clud­ing the lid? If you said yes, you’re mis­taken.

Many items we know to be re­cy­clable, con­tain el­e­ments or parts that are not. Th­ese ‘un­re­cy­clable’ items are con­tam­i­nants and in­ter­fere with the re­cy­cling process.

Things like lids on plas­tic bot­tles must be sep­a­rated and placed in the gen­eral waste bin, while not all types of glass can be re­cy­cled, like drink­ing glasses, ‘blue’ glass, and ‘white’ glass.

HOW TO AP­PLY FOR A JOB

We bet some prac­ti­cal ‘dry-runs’ would have been a great help in pre­par­ing you for your first in­ter­view.

The same can be said for pre­par­ing school-leavers for the ar­du­ous task of ap­ply­ing for a job.

CHOOS­ING A SU­PER­AN­NU­A­TION FUND

Soon af­ter start­ing your first job, you were asked to choose a su­per­an­nu­a­tion fund.

You were told you could pick the com­pany su­per, in­dus­try su­per, or any other su­per out there.

What you were not told, is how to spot the dif­fer­ences in the types of su­per, what th­ese dif­fer­ences mean for your money, what level of risk would suit your re­tire­ment plans (or even what your re­tire­ment plans were, for that mat­ter).

TAX RE­TURNS

At some point in your re­cent his­tory, the murky world of tax­a­tion was prob­a­bly as un­fath­omable as be­ing asked to come up with a new colour.

Hav­ing had a break-down of in­come tax, fringe ben­e­fits, al­low­able de­duc­tions and tax off­sets would prob­a­bly have been of great help to a younger-you, asked to sub­mit your first tax re­turn.

CPR AND BA­SIC LIFE­SAV­ING SKILLS

This is some­thing that most adults never master.

Be­ing able to per­form the Heim­lich ma­noeu­vre suc­cess­fully, know­ing how to pre­vent hy­pother­mia, con­trol bleed­ing or ad­min­is­ter CPR — all of th­ese skills can save a life — per­haps even your own.

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