A NEW BLUE LA­GOON

Put Ice­land on ice. One of the world’s pret­ti­est swim­ming holes is right on our doorstep

Sunday Herald Sun - Escape - - DESTINATION AUSTRIA - JENNY HEWETT

Since the rise of the prover­bial travel in­flu­encer, In­sta­gram has be­come iconic for driv­ing des­ti­na­tion trends. Day after day, our feeds are flooded with un­fil­tered shots of the world’s next “It” spots, en­tic­ing us to visit. And the hype around Ice­land’s geo­ther­mal Blue La­goon, al­beit war­ranted, is ev­i­dence of this. Surely no other nat­u­ral won­der has been bucket-listed as fre­quently in re­cent years. (#BlueLa­goon has been hash­tagged al­most one mil­lion times on In­sta­gram).

But it’s not the only pool in the world that’s worth ’gram­ming. One of earth’s most spec­tac­u­lar nat­u­ral swim­ming holes is right on Aus­tralia’s doorstep.

And it’s likely you won’t have to share it with a soul.

WHERE?

A mere one-hour flight east of Bali, In­done­sia’s Sumba Is­land is bet­ter known for its de­serted surf breaks and uber A-list re­sort, Nihi Sumba, where vil­las start at $1800 a night. But there’s so much more to this Lost World-like par­adise than surf­ing and sun­bathing. Sumba is one of In­done­sia’s last fron­tiers. And deep within the jun­gles of the western re­gion of West Sumba lies Weekuri La­goon, a body of wa­ter so breath­tak­ingly blue, you’ll won­der how it’s man­aged to re­main a se­cret.

WHAT?

The Sumba peo­ple have tightly pre­served their cul­ture and unique an­i­mist be­liefs (the wor­ship of an­ces­tors and na­ture), de­spite the tourism-driven de­vel­op­ment in

WEEKURI LA­GOON

PIC­TURES: ISTOCK

With its spec­tac­u­lar nat­u­ral la­goon, tra­di­tional build­ings and top beaches, Sumba is In­done­sia’s last fron­tier.

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