SAFETY FIRST

Why air­line safety brief­ings tell you to do the things they do

Sunday Herald Sun - Escape - - TRAVEL WISDOM FLYING - AMANDA WOODS

When a safety demon­stra­tion starts on a plane there are those who keep their head in their de­vice or mag­a­zine, per­haps glanc­ing at the flight at­ten­dant so as not to seem com­pletely rude, and those who pay close at­ten­tion.

Like most fre­quent fly­ers, I have been guilty of be­ing in that first group, but I’m try­ing harder to be on the smarter side. Be­cause even if we feel like we could re­cite the en­tire safety talk, a quick re­fresher be­fore ev­ery flight could make a big dif­fer­ence in the un­likely event of an emer­gency.

I’ve also found that when we un­der­stand why we’re be­ing told to do some­thing it’s eas­ier to re­mem­ber what to do, so with that in mind here’s a look at the rea­sons be­hind some of those in-flight safety mes­sages.

DON’T MOVE YOUR SEAT IF YOU’VE LOST YOUR DE­VICE

This is a rel­a­tively new one that is ap­pear­ing on some air­line safety videos, but even if your flight doesn’t in­clude the warn­ing, it’s good ad­vice.

“We’ve had a num­ber of in­ci­dents around the world, in­clud­ing on Aus­tralian air­lines, where peo­ple have moved their seat when they tried to re­trieve their phone and crushed

PIC­TURE: ISTOCK

A flight at­ten­dant demon­strates safety pre­cau­tions be­fore take­off. A quick re­fresher can make a lifesaving dif­fer­ence in an emer­gency.

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