MUM’S HEARTACHE

Tears for lost son and the brother he will never know

Sunday Tasmanian - - Front Page - CHANEL KINNIBURGH [email protected]

BABY Hafidh will never know his big brother Isaack, who was trag­i­cally killed in a car crash.

Hafidh was born just five days later, but the boy’s griev­ing mother Janelle Cooper is tak­ing com­fort from the be­lief Isaack, 18, will be there for Hafidh in spirit.

“Hafidh’s mid­dle name is Isaack, be­cause I want him to have some con­nec­tion to him, even though he will never meet him,” she said.

“I hope that he’s as loyal and as lov­ing as his brother was.

“Isaack will no doubt be look­ing down on him.”

BABY Hafidh will never know his big brother Isaack, but their griev­ing mother says the teenager, killed in a car crash in late De­cem­ber, will al­ways be watch­ing over his sib­ling.

“Hafidh’s mid­dle name is Isaack be­cause I wanted him to have some con­nec­tion to him, even though he will never meet him,” mum Janelle Cooper told the Sun­day Tas­ma­nian.

“I hope that he’s as loyal and as lov­ing as his brother was.

“Isaack will no doubt be look­ing down on him.”

Isaack Cooper-Rozyn­ski, 18, died at the scene of a twocar crash on the Arthur High­way near Du­nal­ley on De­cem­ber 27. His girl­friend Shelbi Berechree, also 18, suf­fered se­vere in­juries in the head-on col­li­sion and died last Sun­day.

A heart­bro­ken Ms Cooper, of West Moonah, had an in­duced labour just days af­ter the fa­tal crash so she wouldn’t run the risk of miss­ing her son’s fu­neral.

Hafidh was born at the Royal Ho­bart Hos­pi­tal on Jan­uary 1, weigh­ing 2.977kg.

“We were re­ally look­ing for­ward to wel­com­ing him [Hafidh] into the world, but I feel ter­ri­ble, be­cause I can’t be 100 per cent happy for Hafidh and I can’t grieve fully for Isaack be­cause I’ve got so much go­ing on,” Ms Cooper said.

“We all loved Isaack. He loved us and he would’ve loved Hafidh. He would want him to be happy and to be loved. He would want him to have the things he never had.”

Ms Cooper said Isaack had the “big­gest heart” and shared an un­break­able bond with each of his sib­lings — Jaiden, 20, Bryana, 19, Abra­ham, 15, and five-year-old Se­lena. A sil­ver heart pen- dant with Isaack’s name in­scribed across the front yes­ter­day hung from Ms Cooper’s neck.

“I still talk to him ev­ery­day. I tell him that I love him, that I hope they’re look­ing af­ter each other and that I hope he’s happy and at peace,” she said through tears.

Ms Cooper said she was strug­gling to come to terms with Isaack’s sud­den death, but would con­tinue to trea­sure the “sim­ple but spe­cial” mem­o­ries.

Isaack’s aunt, Gemma Wil­son, told the Mer­cury last week her nephew al­ways put oth­ers be­fore him­self.

“Even when he was a kid, I’d of­fer to buy him some­thing and he would pick a packet of lol­lies so he could share them with his sib­lings,” she said.

“His whole fam­ily idolised him and he adored them. He al­ways wanted to make ev­ery­one laugh.”

Ms Wil­son said the dou­ble fa­tal­ity had “bro­ken” those who loved Isaack and Shelbi.

“Our fam­ily will never be the same again,” she said.

“For the past year, Shelbi was a huge part of Isaack’s life and now they’re free to fly to­gether and con­tinue their jour­ney.”

Isaack’s fam­ily last night joined about 300 of Shelbi and Isaack’s friends on Bel­lerive beach to re­lease bal­loons, light can­dles and share sto­ries about the pair.

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