TechLife Australia

Master your DSLR: In-camera metering

DISCOVER HOW YOUR CAMERA MEASURES THE LIGHT AND COMES UP WITH AN EXPOSURE.

- { TECHLIFE TEAM ]

YOUR CAMERA’S METERING system measures the intensity of the light reflected by the scene that you’re photograph­ing and determines the appropriat­e settings that will be required to record that light.

This is known as a ‘through the lens’ reflective light reading. You can also take an incident light reading using an external light meter, and set the suggested exposure manually on the camera. Incident light meter readings have the potential to be more accurate, but the process isn’t as convenient as using your camera’s meter.

Lightly tapping the camera’s shutter release button activates the meter, and a suggested aperture and shutter speed combinatio­n — one that should give a ‘correct’ exposure, based on the lighting and the ISO sensitivit­y — is displayed in the viewfinder. There is a range of factors that can lead to the exposure not being quite as correct as it should be, which we’ll get to shortly.

The metering sensors found in today’s digital cameras typically do more than just register the intensity or luminance of the light coming through the lens. They can also take into account the colours in the scene or subject being photograph­ed, and can prioritise the exposure for the parts of a picture that are in focus. These days, metering sensors are densely packed with pixels and are effectivel­y more like low-resolution imaging sensors; in some high-end cameras, they’re being used in conjunctio­n with the camera’s autofocus system to improve the detection and tracking of objects using the colour informatio­n, as well enabling face detection through the viewfinder.

Your digital camera might have a single metering sensor, but there’s a range of different metering modes or patterns that you can choose from. These determine how much of the scene is metered and whether the camera makes any adjustment­s to the meter reading. When the camera is set to an advanced shooting mode, such as Aperture Priority, you can choose an appropriat­e metering mode. The default mode is ’pattern’ metering,

commonly referred to as Evaluative, Matrix or Multi-pattern. In this mode, the camera splits the image into a series of small zones from which it takes individual meter readings. These readings are then compared before the camera suggests an exposure setting that should give a balanced result. It effectivel­y applies its own exposure compensati­on to take account of variations in brightness and where it determines the subject is.

The other metering modes that you’ll find on your camera don’t analyse the scene in quite the same way, and are best reserved for occasions when you have the time and experience to take advantage of them. Take spot metering, for example. This only takes around 1.5–3% of the picture into account, making it unbeatable for taking precise readings from small objects in a scene, or when you want to stop large areas of dark or light tone from fooling the meter. The drawback is that the spot meter is configured to produce a mid-tone exposure value. Point it at a mid-tone subject, such as lush green leaf, and you should get an accurate exposure. But point it at an object that’s either brighter or darker than mid-tone and you’ll end up with an image that’s either underexpos­ed or overexpose­d. (See ‘Metering problems’ at the top of the following page.)

Pattern metering doesn’t always get it right either. It can come unstuck in high-contrast conditions for instance, and it won’t take into account any creative effect that you’re trying to achieve. In both situations, you can use exposure compensati­on to fine-tune the result. Shooting in the RAW format will enable you to tweak the exposure when you process the result, but you might as well try and get it close to perfect in-camera.

THE METERING SENSORS IN TODAY’S CAMERAS TYPICALLY DO MORE THAN JUST REGISTER THE INTENSITY OF THE LIGHT THROUGH THE LENS

 ??  ?? REFLECTIVE
REFLECTIVE
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INCIDENT

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