BenQ TK800

DE­LIV­ERS A BIG-SCREEN 4K EX­PE­RI­ENCE ON A (REL­A­TIVELY) MOD­EST BUD­GET.

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IT WAS LIKE the gods of fate had swept us up into their arms and ten­derly kissed our fore­heads when BenQ’s TK800 True 4K HDR pro­jec­tor ar­rived just in time for this year’s FIFA World Cup. With this fairly com­pact, sleek-look­ing unit in place and fired up, we were able to wit­ness every drop of sweat dripped and every bit of spit gob­bed in stun­ning ul­tra-HD de­tail.

The TK800 is a re­cent ad­di­tion to BenQ’s range of home en­ter­tain­ment pro­jec­tors that are geared to­wards sports and is sim­i­lar, in terms of de­sign, to pre­vi­ous mod­els. The big dif­fer­ence is the bright blue fas­cia.

On the rear of the unit are two HDMI ports (one of which is HDCP 2.2), 3.5mm au­dio jacks (in and out), RS-232, a USB-A and mini-B USB port,12V trig­ger port and VGA — although the lat­ter is slightly re­dun­dant as it doesn’t sup­port 4K. Re­mov­ing VGA in favour of an­other HDMI 2.2 port would have been the best op­tion as it would have al­lowed more 4K-com­pat­i­ble de­vices to be con­nected at the same time.

The TK800 can be used as a front or rear pro­jec­tor and is equally at home placed on a ta­ble as it is mounted to the ceil­ing. Even in bright con­di­tions it can pro­duce a dis­play of around 100 inches in a mod­est-sized room, though this can stretch to a whop­ping 300 inches in larger rooms.

So what is the quality like? Ac­tu­ally pretty damn good, even if the 4K it claims to pro­duce is achieved via pixel shift­ing (when the sys­tem moves the sen­sor half a pixel’s width to ‘dou­ble’ the ap­par­ent res­o­lu­tion by cre­at­ing over­lap­ping data in suc­ces­sive frames) rather than a nat­u­ral 3,840 x 2,160-pixel res­o­lu­tion. This is made pos­si­ble by Texas In­stru­ments’ 0.470-inch DMD XPR 1,920 x 1,080-pixel DLP chip that flashes four times in quick suc­ces­sion to pro­duce an im­age that fools the eye into see­ing 8.3 mil­lion pix­els on screen at one time. Ad­mit­tedly, the dif­fer­ence is very hard to spot, but stack this next to a proper 4K Dig­i­tal Light Pro­cess­ing pro­jec­tor and you’ll no­tice a slight down­grade in the ul­tra-fine de­tails. Not that we’re both­ered by this as the price dif­fer­ence be­tween the two would be colos­sal.

Fo­cus and zoom on the TK800 are en­tirely man­ual, and the lack of lens shift means that the cor­rect setup is vi­tal to get the best out of it. Baf­flingly, Auto Key­stone is en­abled by de­fault which di­min­ishes the fine de­tail, so make sure you de­ac­ti­vate this for the best view­ing results. That said, as this is be­ing mar­keted as a bit of a party piece as op­posed to a se­ri­ous home cinema pro­jec­tor (and is de­signed to project onto a white wall or hung bed­sheet), it is hard to get too hung up about the re­ally fine de­tail.

We can cer­tainly vouch for it in de­liv­er­ing sport in stun­ning de­tail at a de­cent mag­ni­fi­ca­tion and its bud­get price point (trust us, it is for a 4K pro­jec­tor) also makes it per­fect from a pro­fes­sional point of view to show­case your Key­note pre­sen­ta­tions in well-lit con­fer­ence rooms.

The TK800 also comes with a back­lit re­mote con­trol (which is ob­vi­ously a roll-out across nu­mer­ous BenQ pro­jec­tors, as it fea­tures but­tons for functions not present here) and is very easy to set up. Rec­om­mended for a wide range of uses.

[ HARRY DOMANSKI ]

EVEN IN BRIGHT CON­DI­TIONS IT CAN PRO­DUCE A DIS­PLAY OF AROUND 100 INCHES IN A MOD­EST-SIZED ROOM, THOUGH THIS CAN STRETCH TO A WHOP­PING 300 INCHES IN LARGER ROOMS.

BENQ TK800 $2,199 www.benq.com CRIT­I­CAL SPECS 4K UHD @ 3840 x 2160; 3000 lu­mens; 10,000:1 con­trast.

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