Skills for job suc­cess

En­sur­ing staff have the right skills is in­te­gral to the work­place, Han­nah Silverman re­ports.

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TECHNOLOGY is driv­ing ex­cit­ing changes in the in­dus­try but em­ploy­ees still need to keep up with the evo­lu­tion.

Busi­ness SA chief ex­ec­u­tive Peter Vaughan says em­ploy­ers and em­ploy­ees who are not up to date with all forms of me­dia, technology and so­cial net­work­ing will fall be­hind.

‘‘The ones who are do­ing it are the ones cur­rently en­joy­ing suc­cess in dif­fi­cult times,’’ he says. Ed­u­ca­tion, man­u­fac­tur­ing and telecom­mu­ni­ca­tions are among the sec­tors most im­pacted by cur­rent change.

EM­PLOY­ERS who un­der­stand the value in fre­quently up­skilling are the win­ners in the for­ever-chang­ing work­force. From sec­re­taries to rocket sci­en­tists the truth is, if you want to stay in the game you have to keep up with technology.

Or, as Busi­ness SA chief ex­ec­u­tive Peter Vaughan puts it: ‘‘Technology and ed­u­ca­tion and win­ning go hand in hand.’’

He stresses the im­por­tance of up­skilling but says change shouldn’t be looked at as an en­emy.

‘‘Any em­ployee now and any em­ployer who’s not up to date with all forms of me­dia, technology and so­cial net­work­ing is go­ing to be be­hind the eight-ball and find them­selves in­creas­ingly marginalised. The ones who are do­ing it are the ones cur­rently en­joy­ing suc­cess in dif­fi­cult times,’’ he says.

Mr Vaughan says all sec­tors are af­fected by so­cial, cul­tural and tech­no­log­i­cal change. He cites ed­u­ca­tion, pub­lic sec­tor ad­min­is­tra­tion and man­u­fac­tur­ing as in­dus­tries largely af­fected by changes in technology. But he warns South Aus­tralia is not as ad­vanced as the rest of the nation be­cause we have fewer ter­tiary-qual­i­fied peo­ple per capita than any main­land state.

‘‘Un­for­tu­nately we’re not as well ad­vanced as other states,’’ he says.

‘‘It’s a threat be­cause one of the is­sues that we’ll have to con­front in SA is a skills short­age cre­ated by the fact that we don’t have enough skilled peo­ple here and we don’t train enough, plus there are too many young peo­ple drop­ping out too early and we are not and have not been good at up­skilling.’’

AME Re­cruit­ment se­nior con­sul­tant Adam Kennedy says it is not just technology that spurs change in in­dus­tries.

‘‘Fi­nance peo­ple need to keep pace with leg­isla­tive changes be­cause di­rec­tors are de­mand­ing more re­ports and in­for­ma­tion,’’ Mr Kennedy says.

‘‘They’re man­ag­ing cash­flow a lot tighter, par­tic­u­larly at the moment be­cause banks are de­mand­ing more from busi­ness.

‘‘Any­one com­pet­ing in man­u­fac­tur­ing and the com­mod­ity sec­tor is also af­fected (by change) and the rea­son is we need to be able to do it faster, smarter, and cheaper to com­pete with im­ports.’’

He ad­vises em­ploy­ees and job­seek­ers to en­sure their skills are upto-date to give them a com­pet­i­tive edge in the mar­ket.

‘‘The ben­e­fits are ob­vi­ously em­ploy­a­bil­ity and trans­fer­abil­ity of skills,’’ he says.

‘‘When peo­ple learn and un­der­take cour­ses, it’s as much about ca­reer plan­ning as ed­u­ca­tion.’’

Mr Kennedy says most can­di­dates are aware of the skills needed for their cho­sen ca­reers and those who are not qual­i­fied know they need to work harder to prove how valu­able they are to se­cure a par­tic­u­lar job.

Ca­reerlink Train­ing and Re­cruit­ment Ser­vices gen­eral man­ager

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