Me­moir THE HOUSE OF FIC­TION SU­SAN SWINGLER, FRE­MAN­TLE PRESS, $24.95

The Advertiser - SA Weekend - - BOOKS -

De­voted read­ers of El­iz­a­beth Jol­ley had al­ways sensed a high de­gree of the au­to­bi­o­graph­i­cal in her fic­tion, par­tic­u­larly in the Vera Wright tril­ogy and then in the two last nov­els. This feel­ing was later sub­stan­ti­ated first by Jol­ley her­self in var­i­ous es­says and talks ( Cen­tral Mis­chief and Learn­ing to Dance) and then by Brian Dib­ble in his au­tho­rised bi­og­ra­phy, Do­ing Life (2008). The fo­cus of such per­sonal il­lu­mi­na­tion, how­ever, tends to be ei­ther back into Jol­ley’s child­hood and the re­la­tion­ship with and be­tween her par­ents and her mother’s Gen­tle­man Friend, Mr Ber­ring­ton, or to­wards the iden­ti­fi­ca­tion of Jol­ley her­self with Vera Wright, “the Ge­orges’ Wife” who shares a home with a mar­ried cou­ple and bears the hus­band’s child.

Su­san Swingler was born five weeks af­ter that real-life child and for some weeks Leonard Jol­ley, his wife Joyce, his one-time nurse Mon­ica Knight (soon to take up her sec­ond name, El­iz­a­beth) and

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.