NO MORE LUG­GAGE RAGE

IT WAS AS A TRAV­ELLER, NOT AS A DE­SIGNER, THAT MARC NEW­SON WAS IN­SPIRED TO MAKE THE WORLD OF SUIT­CASES A BET­TER PLACE.

The Australian - Wish Magazine - - NEWS -

Like most of us, Aus­tralian de­sign pow­er­house Marc New­son has had bad ex­pe­ri­ences with lug­gage while trav­el­ling around the world: not enough space to fit ev­ery­thing you need, zip break­ing, bag too heavy. But un­like most of us, he is in the po­si­tion to do some­thing about it. So the Lon­don-based New­son has teamed up with ar­guably the orig­i­nal lug­gage com­pany, Louis Vuit­ton, to cre­ate an en­tirely new range of on­board “rolling trunks” for the French lux­ury house.

“I think the world of lug­gage is a slightly woe­ful place,” New­son says. “Per­son­ally, there are many thing that ir­ri­tate me about us­ing prod­ucts like these and I can safely say that I’ve prob­a­bly spent 20 years de­sign­ing these things in my head – aeons be­fore I had the op­por­tu­nity of do­ing so for Louis Vuit­ton. Like many peo­ple I travel a lot and I feel that I am in many way kind of uniquely placed to be able to [undertake the job] as a consumer even more than a de­signer.”

New­son spent 18 months de­vel­op­ing the range, com­ing up with a se­ries of in­no­va­tions that re­sulted in three new patent ap­pli­ca­tions by Louis Vuit­ton. The first is putting the ex­tend­able han­dle (known as a cane) on the out­side of the bag around the frame in­stead of bury­ing it in­side. This means there is 15 per cent more space in­side and the han­dle be­comes a struc­tural el­e­ment of the bag.

“Putting it on the out­side sim­ply made much more sense,” New­son says. “When you open the bag and you start pack­ing you are pre­sented with a com­pletely flat sur­face – or rather two com­pletely flat sur­faces, one on each side. From a psy­cho­log­i­cal per­spec­tive, it’s just so nice to have this big, flat, clean area where you can put any­thing. You don’t need to fit small ob­jects into cav­i­ties that you know aren’t nec­es­sar­ily meant to be there.”

The sec­ond in­no­va­tion is around the zip­per of the case. Most cases have two zip­per-tags but New­son has ditched that and just stuck to one that goes around the whole bag. His rea­son­ing is that hav­ing two zip­per-tags means that peo­ple don’t open them all the way, and this of­ten leads to tear­ing. “With one zip pull, you re­duce break­age po­ten­tial by 50 per cent, which is not in­con­sid­er­able,” he says.

New­son – who has de­signed ev­ery­thing from fur­ni­ture to Ap­ple watches to air­craft in­te­ri­ors – has also come up with in­no­va­tive ma­te­rial for the case of the lug­gage, us­ing ti­ta­nium. This makes them ul­tra-light, with the smaller carry-on bag (50cm) weigh­ing just 2.7kg and the larger one (55cm) 3kg. The cases come in Louis Vuit­ton’s fa­mous mono­gram can­vases and leather in a va­ri­ety of colours. A larger suit­case (at 70cm and to be checked in) will be re­leased at a later date.

Aus­tralian de­signer Marc Newson with his bags for Louis Vuit­ton

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