The Chronicle

TODAY IN HISTORY

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1571 A Turkish fleet is destroyed by Christian forces commanded by Don John of Austria at the Battle of Lepanto. About 30,000 die.

1769 James Cook becomes the second European, after Abel Tasman, to sight New Zealand. After claiming it for Britain, Cook maps the coast.

1798 George Bass and Matthew Flinders leave Sydney on the small sloop Norfolk, built on Norfolk Island, to check that Van Diemen’s Land is separated from mainland Australia.

1817 The first Methodist chapel in Australia is opened at Castlereag­h, north of Penrith, by Reverend Samuel Leigh. It was built by settler John Lees.

1830 Lieutenant governor George Arthur, of Van Diemen’s Land, organises a seven-week drive by police, soldiers, and settlers, the Black Line, to capture and confine all Aborigines. Only two are captured. Two others are shot.

1849 Edgar Allan Poe, 40, dies in Baltimore, likely after a drinking session.

1858 Englishman William Jevons, who will become one of the world’s great economists, has a damning report published anonymousl­y in Sydney on sanitation at The Rocks. He says lack of drains lets sewage flow into homes.

1854 Gold miner James Scobie is kicked to death near the Eureka Hotel, Ballarat. This stirs resentment of authority that would culminate in the Eureka Stockade rebellion.

1916 Taronga Zoo opens at its present site.

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