The Cobram Courier

Bright sparks set to shine

- By Isabelle Harris

I had the opportunit­y to attend an Internatio­nal Women’s Day event this week — not something I normally do but I had been asked, so off I went.

It was a breakfast for young women to meet mentors working in their fields of interest, so some sat with surgeons and doctors, others with police officers, even more still with human resource profession­als and accountant­s.

I was privileged enough to sit with a group interested in communicat­ions and journalism; normally I’m on the sidelines buzzing around with a camera and attacking at random with my notepad and phone.

The room was crowded with questions for the mentors as details of their career paths, their experience­s, their qualificat­ions and their advice echoed back.

To be honest, when I’d been asked to go I thought it would be a little dry and boring, with stilted questions and awkward conversati­ons.

I’d arrived late (thanks, road constructi­on) to find the table where I was to sit alive with conversati­on, punctuated by inspiring guest speakers.

One of the students at my table turned to me and asked about my experience in dayto-day work and how I’d gotten there, but it wasn’t the question that struck me.

It was the genuine interest in her eyes as she listened carefully, it was the way she explained and phrased things in a way beyond her years.

All the other young women around the room were the same and had the same drive, the same passion for their futures.

It was incredible the way you could see tomorrow’s doctors, engineers, marketing advisors, veterinari­ans, police officers — simply too many career choices to count.

They seemed to be the bright sparks of the future and it would be their intellect, their fierceness and their bravery that would surely help us fix the problems we’ve created and ignored.

It was a revolution at a women’s breakfast, but it was not one of weapons; it was one of minds and hearts that would stand tall against the problems that have plagued us.

I used to think the world was screwed, that the next generation had too large a task to fix the mistakes of those who came before us.

Now, I see these women with fire in their hearts and determinat­ion in their eyes.

We’re going to be fine.

It was a revolution at a women’s breakfast, but it was not one of weapons; it was one of minds and hearts that would stand tall against the problems that have plagued us.

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