TO SHOP OR NOT AT WORK

I SEE A LOT OF MY CO-WORK­ERS BUY­ING CHRIST­MAS GIFTS ON­LINE AND GET­TING THEM DE­LIV­ERED TO THE OF­FICE. ISN’T THIS A MIS­USE OF COM­PANY RE­SOURCES?

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DAR­REN BUCHANAN MANAG­ING DI­REC­TOR, HAYS QUEENS­LAND

While your time at work should be spent work­ing, not shop­ping for gifts on­line, it is be­com­ing more ac­cept­able to have on­line shop­ping de­liv­ered to work­places. Some peo­ple can­not have parcels de­liv­ered to their home be­cause they ei­ther re­quire a sig­na­ture or there is not a se­cure place for items to be left. Oth­ers are not able to get to a post of­fice or de­pot dur­ing open­ing hours, par­tic­u­larly full-time em­ploy­ees. Hav­ing parcels de­liv­ered to their work­place is there­fore un­der­stand­able. Hav­ing said that, it is im­por­tant to be con­sid­er­ate and not over-do it. If you are un­sure, ask your man­ager.

SINEAD HOURIGAN BRIS­BANE DI­REC­TOR, ROBERT WAL­TERS

These days, peo­ple spend a lot of time at work and as long as peo­ple are be­ing sen­si­ble about how much time they spend shop­ping on­line, I don’t imag­ine this should be an is­sue. On the flip side, if peo­ple spend an in­or­di­nate amount of time on­line shop­ping and it is af­fect­ing the work­load of other peo­ple, then it should not be al­lowed to con­tinue. I don’t think hav­ing things de­liv­ered to the of­fice should be con­sid­ered a mis­use of com­pany re­sources. I find it im­pos­si­ble to get parcels de­liv­ered to home as I am never there dur­ing the day so get­ting things de­liv­ered to work is a ne­ces­sity.

JULIE FORD SE­NIOR EX­EC­U­TIVE CON­SUL­TANT, McARTHUR

When on­line shop­ping first be­came a thing, many or­gan­i­sa­tions re­stricted ac­cess to shop­ping sites. Some still do. Re­cent sur­veys in­di­cate that per­cep­tion has changed in the busi­ness world, recog­nis­ing that for many em­ploy­ees, it’s the only way they shop and it’s more se­cure de­liv­er­ing to the of­fice than left on doorsteps. At McArthur, we of­fer staff time off for Christ­mas shop­ping as an em­ployee ben­e­fit, so it’s rea­son­able that shop­ping on­line is no dif­fer­ent. How­ever, staff still need to fo­cus on pro­duc­tiv­ity and busi­nesses need to be clear about bound­aries by hav­ing clear pol­icy and mon­i­tor­ing use.

DR NERIDA HILL­BERG DI­REC­TOR OF PSY­CHOL­OGY, FER­RIS MAN­AGE­MENT CON­SUL­TANTS

Yes it is. Many or­gan­i­sa­tions are now adopt­ing poli­cies on in­ter­net use dur­ing of­fice hours. Com­pa­nies are out­lin­ing what is per­mis­si­ble on a work-pro­vided de­vice dur­ing work time. Even with­out a for­mal pol­icy, it’s highly un­pro­fes­sional as well as un­fair to col­leagues do­ing the right thing by their em­ployer. When the work en­vi­ron­ment isn’t per­ceived as eq­ui­table and fair, or­gan­i­sa­tional cul­ture suf­fers. My ad­vice is to demon­strate how much more pro­duc­tive and valu­able you are than your on­line shop­ping col­leagues. Bosses do no­tice.

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