WISE WORDS FOR TEENS

WHAT’S YOUR AD­VICE TO THIS YEAR’S CROP OF SCHOOL LEAVERS?

The Courier-Mail - Career One - - Front Page - email ques­tions to ca­reer­[email protected]

DARREN BUCHANAN MAN­AG­ING DI­REC­TOR, HAYS QUEENS­LAND

Work on de­vel­op­ing soft skills. A will­ing­ness to learn is one of the most com­monly re­quested soft skills. Em­ploy­ers con­sider the ideal em­ployee as one who up­skills reg­u­larly, looks at what the com­pe­ti­tion is do­ing and keeps an eye on cus­tomer feed­back. An abil­ity to ac­cept and adapt to change is im­por­tant too. Em­ploy­ers want peo­ple who see change as an op­por­tu­nity for growth and in­no­va­tion. In­ter­per­sonal and com­mu­ni­ca­tion skills are highly val­ued. It is all well and good think­ing of solutions to chal­lenges, but soft skills get lost if you don’t com­mu­ni­cate knowl­edge to oth­ers.

SINEAD HOURI­GAN BRIS­BANE DI­REC­TOR, ROBERT WAL­TERS

Al­though em­ploy­ers may show a level of in­ter­est in your post-school qual­i­fi­ca­tions, it is ex­tremely un­usual for any­one to seek in­for­ma­tion about your school aca­demic his­tory. What they will no­tice was your en­gage­ment in other ways – your in­volve­ment in the lo­cal com­mu­nity, lead­er­ship dis­played in sport­ing teams, en­gage­ment with oth­ers through men­tor­ing pro­grams and kind­ness to those less for­tu­nate than your­self through char­i­ta­ble works. All of these will speak more in years to come of your char­ac­ter as a per­son and will go much fur­ther to de­ter­min­ing your post-school suc­cess.

JULIE FORD SE­NIOR EX­EC­U­TIVE CON­SUL­TANT, McARTHUR

Do what works for you. If you are go­ing on to fur­ther ed­u­ca­tion, then com­mit to it and en­sure you are pur­su­ing your strengths and pas­sions. If you are tak­ing a gap year, then travel or get a job – don’t waste this time. Fol­low your travel dreams or earn some money. If you are go­ing into em­ploy­ment, get a job as soon as you can – it might not be your ”for­ever job” but it is a start in learn­ing new skills and build­ing ex­pe­ri­ence. Don’t sit at home and squan­der this time – the longer you leave it to make de­ci­sions about your fu­ture, the more chance the de­ci­sion will be made for you.

DR NERIDA HILLBERG DI­REC­TOR OF PSY­CHOL­OGY, FER­RIS MAN­AGE­MENT CON­SUL­TANTS

I’m pas­sion­ate about ef­fec­tive ca­reer guid­ance, es­pe­cially to se­nior high school stu­dents who are map­ping out their fu­ture lives. So­ci­ety can tend to place such a high value on a univer­sity de­gree. While I don’t dis­agree, and I recog­nise that knowl­edge and ed­u­ca­tion open doors, I be­lieve we also need to value tech­ni­cal and trades roles just as highly. Look­ing at the up­ward trend in such op­por­tu­ni­ties pre­dicted by the gov­ern­ment, I’d ad­vise in­ter­ested school leavers to pur­sue a trade. Do what makes you happy, not what oth­ers ex­pect of you.

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