5 bunch of IM­MOR­TALISED FOOD­IES

The Courier-Mail - QWeekend - - UPFRONT -

STROGANOFF

Rus­sian oli­garchs the Stroganov fam­ily – rich­est in the tsar­dom since the late 1500s – had a fond­ness for sautéed beef in sour cream sauce. Blame the French for adding mush­rooms and re­nam­ing it Stroganoff.

SAND­WICH

When 18th cen­tury English toff John Mon­tagu, 4th Earl of Sand­wich, told his lack­eys to get him meat between two pieces of bread so he could con­tinue play­ing crib­bage, his in­ven­tion caught on.

NA­CHOS

Short for Ig­na­cio, the na­cho is named for Mex­i­can maître d’ Ig­na­cio Anaya, who in 1943 served up fried tor­tillas with melted cheese and jalapeños to the wives of US sol­diers sta­tioned on the Rio Grande.

WELLING­TON

Arthur Welles­ley, hero of the Bat­tle of Water­loo, also lent his ti­tle to the welling­ton boot – but the 1st Duke of Welling­ton’s yen for beef with pâté, mush­rooms, truf­fles and Madeira sauce in pas­try is now foodie folk­lore.

MARGHERITA

Late-1800s Neapoli­tan piz­zaiolo Raf­faele Es­pos­ito was hired to cre­ate a spe­cial dish for Queen Margherita of Savoy. The re­sult mir­rorred the Ital­ian flag: red (tomato), white (moz­zarella) and green (basil).

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