5bunch of CITIES KNOWN BY OTHER NAMES

The Courier-Mail - QWeekend - - UPFRONT -

YERBA BUENA

Coined in 1776, the orig­i­nal name for San Fran­cisco was Yerba Buena – Span­ish for “good herb”. It’s ironic the city fa­thers didn’t change it back to that dur­ing the hip­pie Haight-Ash­bury era of the ’60s.

MUFF

Eglin­ton, North­ern Ire­land, was known as (the) Muff, Gaelic for “the plain”. In the mid-1800s, due to the pro­lif­er­a­tion of other nearby Muffs, the res­i­dents re­named it in hon­our of Ire­land’s 13th Earl Eglin­ton.

MONKCH­ESTER

It be­gan as a lone Ro­man fort called Pons Aelius, then was dubbed the rather won­der­ful Monkch­ester, but all it took was a cas­tle built on the River Tyne in 1080 for the north­ern English city to be so bor­ingly named.

BORBURY

This ham­let in North­ern Ire­land’s Sper­rin Moun­tains had many names – from Borbury to The Cross to Moy­hee­lan and Bal­li­nascreen – un­til Lon­don’s Wor­ship­ful Com­pany of Drap­ers dubbed it Drap­er­stown in 1818.

DUNEDIN

The Scots cap­i­tal, Ed­in­burgh, was founded as Dunedin, from “dun”, the Celtic word for fort. Ac­counts vary, but one says it was re­placed by the Ger­manic equiv­a­lent “burgh” when the Teu­tons came in the 7th cen­tury.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.