The Courier-Mail

STAY, DEAL WITH IT

Ruling coward trolls out of line

- Dennis Atkins is The Courier-Mail’s national affairs editor dennis.atrkins@news.com.au XAVIER TOBY Twitter: @xaviertoby Xavier Toby is a comedian and writer

contest is right now, this week’s cover of Time magazine has a headshot of Trump with a simple headline: “Deal with it”.

This is Trump’s message to the establishm­ent, the Washington insiders (including the lobbyists Trump uses to get his way on Capitol Hill) and the rest of the Republican field.

It’s not just an angry white male, right-wing fringe that supports him either. There are plenty of “Reagan Democrats” – one time working class Democratic Party supporters who have switched sides – and otherwise moderates who are sick of politics as usual.

This is Trump’s constituen­cy: People who are tired of politician­s who make promises and break them, tell lies about what is happening in the country and the world, live a life of “entitlemen­t” in Washington while they struggle back on main street and everyone who wants someone to stick it to the man.

Any contradict­ions between these aspiration­s and Trump’s own billionair­e status do not matter.

How long can someone who has defied the Washington convention­al wisdom all year last? That’s a hard question to answer although most people expect the Republican establishm­ent and its backers to intervene and construct an exit for Trump.

However, given the volatility and the sour nature of the US electorate, you wouldn’t want to bet your house on Trump flaming out at any given point. He’s as mad as hell and he’s not going to take it any more – as the Trumplike character Howard Beale said in the 1976 film, Network.

How many Americans are mad enough to take the ultimate step of backing The Donald has become the big story of the 2016 US Presidenti­al election. ARE you fed up with all the hateful, hurtful rubbish that’s in nearly every comments section on the internet and on Twitter?

Me too. So I’ve come up with a solution. The “say it to their face” rule.

It’s simple. You’re not allowed to comment, post or leave any message anywhere on the internet unless you’re prepared to say it to that person’s face.

Before you comment under someone’s photo that they look a little overweight, you can see a pimple or that you’d really like to see them naked, before you write under someone’s article or Tweet that someone’s opinion reeks like something particular­ly nasty, that they’ve used the wrong “your” or that you’ve run over animals that were funnier, think to yourself, “Would I say this to someone’s face?”

If you would, then type away. If you wouldn’t, then shut the hell up.

It takes less than a minute to create a fake email address, or Twitter account, or whatever you need to hide behind, so you can spout that little insult that for some reason you’re convinced is worth sharing with the world.

It might even seem fun. Writing anonymousl­y something that’s way too naughty to say out loud. Some comment that you don’t really agree with but think is humorous.

You can even pretend to be whoever you want. Your online alter ego might be some seven-foot tall, muscle-encrusted super demon.

But you know who doesn’t get to hide or pretend?

The person in the photo. The person who wrote the article. The person that you’re writing about.

Here’s an idea for a reality TV show. Pick an article or photo or anything.

Choose one of the more insulting comments. It shouldn’t be hard, as that’s just about all of them.

Then find the person who wrote it and pay for their flights and a hotel to come and meet whoever it is they insulted.

To get the person who did the insulting to agree to all this we’ll pay them or trick them or something. However they do it on Jerry Springer should be fine.

The next step is for them to meet the person they insulted to see if they’ll say the same insult to that person’s face.

The final step is to leave the two people alone with some weapons to sort out their difference­s. Maybe even tie up the person who did the insulting, just to make it unfair.

So before you type that next comment, don’t just think about how you’ll feel after you’ve typed it.

Think about how you’re making the person at the other end feel. The person that you’re typing about.

There is a person there and while they might have no idea who you are, they do know that you’re a real person.

So for them, whatever you type, it’s just like you’re saying it to their face.

You know what the world would be without your hateful, poorly thought out and immature little comments? Better.

 ??  ?? TRUMP’S TROOPS: Donald Trump greets supporters after a rally in Mobile County, Alabama last week. Picture: Getty Images
TRUMP’S TROOPS: Donald Trump greets supporters after a rally in Mobile County, Alabama last week. Picture: Getty Images
 ??  ?? Jeremy Corbyn and Donald Trump have a couple of things in common. Both speak their minds at a time when a lot of people in Britain and the US have had it with politics as usual and the mealy mouthed calibratio­n of the political persona.
Jeremy Corbyn and Donald Trump have a couple of things in common. Both speak their minds at a time when a lot of people in Britain and the US have had it with politics as usual and the mealy mouthed calibratio­n of the political persona.
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