What to do if your pet starts to strug­gle in sum­mer heat?

The Daily Examiner - - NEWS -

OUR pets can’t sweat all over their bod­ies as hu­mans can.

Sweat al­lows the body to reg­u­late its tem­per­a­ture.

In­stead an­i­mals such as dogs rely on panting to get rid of the hot air and pro­duce only a small amount of sweat through their footpads.

This makes them ex­tremely sus­cep­ti­ble to heat ex­haus­tion in hot and hu­mid con­di­tions.

Heat ex­haus­tion can be par­tic­u­larly dan­ger­ous and even fa­tal, so it’s im­por­tant to be able to recog­nise the signs and know what to do.

Watch out for: ● Ex­ces­sive panting; ● Ex­ag­ger­ated and noisy panting;

● Lethargy; ● Drool­ing; ● Weak­ness or col­lapse; ● Vom­it­ing.

What to do if you sus­pect heat ex­haus­tion:

● Take your pet to the vet im­me­di­ately;

● An emer­gency vet is avail­able 24 hours, seven days a week at River­bank An­i­mal Hos­pi­tal on 6643 1700;

● On your way to the vet you can cool your pet by ap­ply­ing wet tow­els to hair­less parts of your pet’s body (groin or paws);

● Place your pet in front of the air-con­di­tioner or a fan while you are in the car.

Call River­bank An­i­mal Hos­pi­tal for ad­vice on 6642 3083.

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DOGS RELY ON PANTING TO GET RID OF THE HOT AIR AND PRO­DUCE ONLY A SMALL AMOUNT OF SWEAT THROUGH THEIR FOOTPADS.

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