Let­ter of the Week

The Gold Coast Bulletin - - NEWS -

FAR too many peo­ple have fallen vic­tim to their own stu­pid­ity by con­sum­ing drugs in what­ever form.

Of re­cent in­stances they have taken their drugs/pills at mu­sic fes­ti­vals and sev­eral have died. Will they ever learn?

Pill test­ing is not the an­swer as this tends to con­done drug use. If they think this is the only way to get a “high”, then they are look­ing in the wrong di­rec­tion. Ab­sti­nence is the only so­lu­tion.

Per­haps one an­swer is for those who re­cover from their drug (ab)use (in­clud­ing al­co­hol ex­cesses) to be sent the bill for the am­bu­lance, treat­ment and hos­pi­tal­i­sa­tion.

To re­sult in death is heart­break­ing for fam­i­lies and friends, but the user does not think about them or the pos­si­ble out­come when they in­dulge.

Re­gret­tably, there will al­ways be those who suc­cumb to peer pres­sure or a de­sire to “fit in” and de­cide to try a lit­tle “lift” in their life, which in most cases ends up be­ing to their detri­ment.

If in doubt, don’t!

PETER JOHN­SON, ROBINA

WHY does it take just one day for the United Na­tions to find an 18year-old old Saudi woman is a le­git­i­mate refugee while Mr Dut­ton has taken over five years to de­ter­mine if the peo­ple on Nauru and Manus are le­git­i­mate refugees?

Many cases are still un­de­ter­mined even after that amount of time.

With the nec­es­sary case facts, coun­try in­for­ma­tion and a proper hear­ing, a de­ter­mi­na­tion can be made within a day.

Un­der the LNP though, ap­pli­cants are con­fronted with racism, prej­u­dice and cru­elty.

All is not lost though, while Aus­tralia dithers, Canada has come to the aid of this des­per­ate woman.

RAY ARM­STRONG, TWEED HEADS SOUTH

I READ that again we have al­le­ga­tions of cor­rup­tion against Cr Kristyn Boul­ton.

As a per­son who lives in the coun­cil­lor’s divi­sion, I have found her to be do­ing a good job and is al­ways will­ing to deal with the lit­tle things that make our lives com­fort­able.

I then read that yet an­other pe­ti­tion is be­ing cir­cu­lated about the idea of a new gam­bling fa­cil­ity on the Coast.

At the end of the day I don’t think any pe­ti­tion signed by .001% of the Gold Coast pop­u­la­tion really mat­ters.

Then I read a let­ter by Sue Dono­van, of the Main Beach As­soc

(GCB, 9/1/19) com­plain­ing about projects that have al­ready been ap­proved.

The Gold Coast is a grow­ing city, Main Beach is mainly high­rises, Main Beach busi­nesses are com­plain­ing about a lack of peo­ple, so the ob­vi­ous so­lu­tion is that more peo­ple in the area brings pros­per­ity to the busi­nesses and more jobs for the lo­cals.

Can’t we open the paper and read about things that peo­ple are en­joy­ing?

After all it is only a few weeks to our na­tional day when we shall see

sto­ries of protests, claims of geno­cide, ac­cu­sa­tions and counter ac­cu­sa­tions fly­ing all over the place and only the odd re­port of peo­ple be­ing happy.

I can only wish for a happy 2019 for all.

RON NIGHTIN­GALE, BIGGERA WA­TERS

IF Amer­i­can golfer Matt Kuchar walked down the street I would not claim to recog­nise him.

How­ever, with a mild in­ter­est in golf, I have been watch­ing the Hawai­ian Open Cham­pi­onship this week.

This fel­low, although now 40, ex­udes some­thing that seems to be miss­ing in sport these days. A sense of en­joy­ment to be tak­ing part.

Not there to win the mil­lions on of­fer (although that is a nice side­bar) but just to be there and en­joy­ing the game.

No hissy fits and tantrums, just a nice guy do­ing what he has to do for a liv­ing.

Oh that a lot of so called sports­men would fol­low suit. Wouldn’t it be a lovely world.

FRANK TEWKESBURY, SOUTH­PORT

A FA­TAL­ITY ap­pears the only out­come which may cause leg­is­la­tion to be pre­pared for silent elec­tric mo­tor scoot­ers, mo­torised skate­boards and the many var­i­ous types of foot­path trans­porta­tion.

All are le­gal and do not re­quire li­censes. In ad­di­tion, cy­clists ped­alling at full speed on the foot­path with the bike lane empty.

We are talk­ing about Surfers Par­adise Es­planade, an ex­tremely busy foot­path fre­quented by most tourists. If an ac­ci­dent causes med­i­cal and le­gal costs, who will be li­able?

Will it be the state gov­ern­ment, lo­cal coun­cil or the in­di­vid­ual?

Pedes­tri­ans are an en­dan­gered species and it re­quires the state La­bor Gov­ern­ment to act.

They man­aged to amend the anti-bikie laws which were highly suc­cess­ful, very quickly.

Ob­vi­ously union lead­ers de­sired the change.

Per­haps the Premier or State Min­is­ter can pro­vide pedes­tri­ans the same ef­fi­ciency.

If there was a re­sponse, I an­tic­i­pate it will be “we are mov­ing for­ward and it is un­der re­view”.

REG SPENCE, SURFERS PAR­ADISE

SURELY there’s noth­ing new about sharks in Cur­rumbin Creek (GCB, Jan 12)?

If sharks have been seen and caught in Gold Coast canals in front of homes then surely a larger river sys­tem like this creek must be home to many more.

Swim­ming in all these wa­ter­ways is dan­ger­ous as bull sharks es­pe­cially are in great num­bers. Why not? Wa­ter­ways are their homes. These rel­a­tives of whaler sharks can be prone to at­tack even in shal­lower wa­ter. I’m not in favour of sig­nage erected ev­ery­where as it is the sole re­spon­si­bil­ity of hu­man be­ings to be cau­tious when­ever in­trud­ing into the nat­u­ral habi­tats of other an­i­mals.

KEN JOHN­STON, ROCHEDALE SOUTH

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