Coun­cil’s fail­ure to un­der­stand fly­ing foxes

The Morning Bulletin - - YOUR SAY -

COUN­CIL­LOR Ellen Smith’s an­nounce­ment in The Morn­ing Bul­letin that the coun­cil will lobby the State Gov­ern­ment to move the lit­tle fly­ing foxes from Kapra as soon as they ar­rive will re­sult in the fol­low­ing.

The very first will be con­fronta­tion as a di­rect re­sult of the lack of con­sul­ta­tion with all stake­hold­ers in the re­gion in­clud­ing those who are called upon to res­cue fly­ing foxes and are res­i­dents and ratepay­ers.

As knowl­edge­able peo­ple in this field with over 30 years’ ex­pe­ri­ence, fly­ing foxes, in par­tic­u­larly the lit­tle reds, will be so ex­hausted that any at­tempt to move them on while they are in such a poor con­di­tion will re­sult in fly­ing foxes falling into res­i­dents’ back­yards dead and dy­ing for chil­dren to pick them up.

It hap­pened at Duaringa.

The coun­cil’s fail­ure to un­der­stand the be­hav­iour of fly­ing foxes de­spite the hun­dreds of dol­lars of in­for­ma­tion and time spent send­ing the in­for­ma­tion by a lo­cal ex­pert to the coun­cil and all coun­cil­lors is tes­ti­mony to the coun­cil’s se­lec­tive con­sul­ta­tion process.

Yet, at her own ex­pense and oth­ers will be called upon by mem­bers of the com­mu­nity to col­lect in­jured and

or­phaned fly­ing foxes from peo­ple’s back­yards, with some of these hav­ing to spend some time in care.

This per­son is the only per­son in Cen­tral Queens­land area knowl­edge­able enough with the re­quired fa­cil­i­ties to look af­ter them.

De­spite her ex­tended knowl­edge coun­cil will no doubt con­sult peo­ple who are not as knowl­edge­able or have no knowl­edge and who will have difficulty iden­tify the specie let alone if they are in poor con­di­tion, heav­ily preg­nant or have de­pen­dent young. Hap­pened at Moura.

The lit­tle red fly­ing foxes are the only pol­li­na­tors of our hard­wood for­est and are seek­ing refuge in towns tem­po­rar­ily be­cause of the le­gal and il­le­gal large-scale land clear­ing in CQ and ha­rass­ment else­where.

In ad­di­tion they are the key­stone specie for the sur­vival of our unique wildlife.

Left alone, fly­ing foxes will sleep dur­ing the day and fly out at night to neigh­bour­ing flow­er­ing blos­soms and when the blos­soms are fin­ished they will move on as they nor­mally do.

Left alone they do not pose any sig­nif­i­cant threat to peo­ple’s health or water sup­plies, un­less they are ha­rassed and are placed up in the air dur­ing the day.

Never heard of any­one get­ting sick from a water sup­ply as a re­sult of fly­ing foxes.

I have been drink­ing tank water for over 20 years and I have bats fly­ing over my roof each night.

De­spite LG dis­ap­point­ment I am still here.

Peo­ple are more at a threat of in­jury or even death from their dog than from a fly­ing fox.

I am dis­gusted at the ter­ri­ble acts of an­i­mal cru­elty forced on them and other an­i­mals by mislead­ing in­for­ma­tion from the me­dia, peo­ple and lo­cal coun­cils whose knowl­edge of an­i­mals is ex­tremely lim­ited whether they be do­mes­tic, companion, na­tive and in­tro­duced wild.

It does not make any sense that LG ac­cuse cats of de­stroy­ing wildlife and wildlife must be pro­tected but they must mean se­lec­tive wildlife.

You get to the point in your life that de­spite pro­vid­ing the ev­i­dence of such ter­ri­ble acts over the years, do­ing all the right things but be­ing ig­nored, the lack of con­sul­ta­tion with all stake­hold­ers be­fore de­ci­sions are made will and does lead to civil dis­obe­di­ence. Lyn Laskus, Emu Park

‘‘ THE LIT­TLE RED FLY­ING FOXES ARE THE ONLY POL­LI­NA­TORS OF OUR HARD­WOOD FOR­EST AND ARE SEEK­ING REFUGE IN TOWNS TEM­PO­RAR­ILY BE­CAUSE OF THE LE­GAL AND IL­LE­GAL LARGE-SCALE LAND CLEAR­ING IN CQ AND HA­RASS­MENT FROM OTHER PLACES. LYN LASKUS

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