We must do bet­ter car­ing for the world

The Riverine Herald - - CROSSROADS - Tim Bowles

THIS term my son’s school has caught the re­cy­cling bug.

He has been learn­ing about ways to re­duce, re­use and re­cy­cle.

There are spe­cial bins in the class­room, and plas­tic bot­tle re­cy­cling com­pe­ti­tions.

His show and tell is now about re­cy­cling in the home.

The end re­sult is that we now have a lit­tle re­cy­cling po­lice­man in the house.

Telling us when we are us­ing too much plas­tic or putting the com­post in the wrong bin.

Af­ter see­ing his aware­ness grow and see­ing his en­thu­si­asm, sus­tain­able liv­ing is be­gin­ning to catch on.

He has made it per­sonal for me and I have learnt from him.

We now have spe­cial re­cy­cling projects in the back yard with a re­newed zest for sus­tain­able liv­ing. More rid­ing to work awaits. It should be per­sonal to all of us.

Usu­ally, the mo­ti­vat­ing ar­gu­ment pre­sented for this is our re­spon­si­bil­ity to fu­ture gen­er­a­tions.

This is a good rea­son to care for our world, from a Chris­tian point of view also, as we have a re­spon­si­bil­ity to love our neigh­bour.

Our neigh­bour could le­git­i­mately be ex­tended beyond those in im­me­di­ate need around us, to those in po­ten­tial need beyond our time.

When the Bi­ble im­plores us to care for our world, such as in Psalm 8, it is per­sonal be­cause it is a role given to hu­man­ity by God.

Cre­ation is his gift to us to care for and en­joy.

As be­ings made in the im­age

This per­sonal les­son has chal­lenged how I live, but it has been fun too. To­gether we are be­com­ing bet­ter stew­ards of God’s world that has been en­trusted to us

of God, it couldn’t get more per­sonal.

We are a part of his cre­ation given the role of ste­ward­ship.

Bi­b­li­cal writ­ers, when com­mu­ni­cat­ing about cre­ation, of­ten use the tech­nique of per­son­i­fi­ca­tion to show us what we can learn from the cre­ated or­der.

In Psalm 19 the heaven’s ‘de­clare’ the glory of God, skies ‘pro­claim’ his hand­i­work. All can hear its ‘voice’. The en­vi­ron­ment is our first in­tro­duc­tion to God.

He him­self then stepped into our world through the per­son Je­sus, deep­en­ing that re­la­tion- ship and mak­ing it very per­sonal.

Un­for­tu­nately, the noise from cre­ation isn’t al­ways so full of joy.

Paul writ­ing to the church in Rome speaks of the whole cre­ation ‘groan­ing’ due to the dis­rup­tion and bro­ken­ness it longs to be freed from.

Let cre­ation speak and we might not be pleased by what it has to say to us.

But there is hope be­cause God hears the cry for re­newal and prom­ises a new cre­ation in the end.

His work has be­gun and in Je­sus we see how spec­tac­u­lar it will be.

In ris­ing from the dead Je­sus shows that no bro­ken­ness is too great for God to over­come.

My son has shown me how my part­ner­ship with God re­quires me to think about my im­pact on the earth and to join with God and oth­ers to bring re­newal to this world.

This per­sonal les­son has chal­lenged how I live, but it has been fun too.

To­gether we are be­com­ing bet­ter stew­ards of God’s world that has been en­trusted to us. Tim Bowles Moama Angli­can Gram­mar School chap­lain

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