PART THREE Ba­sics of TIG weld­ing

THE THIRD IN A SERIES ON HOW TO WELD

The Shed - - Welding - By Greg Hol­ster Pho­to­graphs: Jude Wood­side

Gas Tung­sten Arc Weld­ing (GTAW) — also com­monly known as Tung­sten In­ert Gas (TIG) weld­ing — is a weld­ing process that pro­duces an elec­tric arc be­tween a non-con­sum­able tung­sten elec­trode and the par­ent metal that is be­ing welded.

TIG can be used to weld mild steel, high-ten­sile steels, stain­less steels of all grades, nickel chrome al­loys, Monel nickel cop­per al­loys, In­conel, ti­ta­nium, alu­minium, mag­ne­sium, brass, bronze, cop­per, and many space-age met­als. Even gold can be TIG welded. You can even weld dis­sim­i­lar met­als: cop­per to brass, stain­less steel to mild steel, stain­less steel to cop­per (great for still mak­ing). I en­joy TIG weld­ing. TIG weld­ing pro­duces clean, pre­cise welds on al­most any metal and the weld pool can be eas­ily ma­nip­u­lated.

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