FIRST AID ES­SEN­TIALS

All you need to stay fit and well along the way

The Sunday Telegraph (Sydney) - Escape - - TRAVEL WISDOM | HEALTH - LISA MAYOH

Things can go wrong on hol­i­days, and it pays to be pre­pared. You don’t want to be in the mid­dle of a Tus­can sun­flower field and not have your al­lergy an­ti­his­tamine, or run out of In­sulin dur­ing a 14-day trek through South­east Asia. Pre­pare and pack a first-aid kit and you’ll be ready for any­thing. Here are some things to in­clude – but check with your fam­ily doc­tor or phar­ma­cist if you have par­tic­u­lar health needs, or are go­ing some­where re­mote.

STINGERS BE GONE

There’s noth­ing worse than hav­ing an itchy bite and no re­lief. Al­ways pack Stin­gose as well as an­ti­his­tamines if you re­act badly to mosquito or in­sect bites. Bet­ter still – throw in roll-on mozzie re­pel­lent to stop the cause.

BAND-AIDS AND BAN­DAGES

Put a few Band-Aids in your wal­let or carry bag – es­pe­cially if trav­el­ling with kids. A ban­dage is also use­ful to sup­port strained limbs, re­duce swelling and hold dress­ings in place.

AN­TI­SEP­TIC

Savlon or an­ti­sep­tic cream is es­sen­tial for clean­ing wounds and easy to pop in your first-aid kit. It can be for a tod­dler’s scraped knee in Bali or a coral scratch af­ter snorkelling in Fiji.

EYE­WASH

Sodium chlo­ride 0.9% is good to wash out for­eign ob­jects from your eye, but a gen­eral Vi­sine so­lu­tion is handy for al­ler­gies or help­ing ease sore eyes af­ter a big night at an Ir­ish pub or af­ter a sad farewell to fam­ily mem­bers.

HAND WASH

An an­tibac­te­rial gel is small, and can be used all day, ev­ery day. Trains, planes, churches and mu­se­ums – full of peo­ple, and germs spread eas­ily.

THER­MOME­TER

If you’ve got chil­dren and need to know tem­per­a­tures in the mid­dle of the night in a for­eign city, pack your own ther­mome­ter for ease of mind. Dig­i­tal ones, al­though pricey, are more ac­cu­rate and easy to use.

COLD AND FLU TABLETS

Cold and flu tablets can help shake that runny nose, sore throat or foggy head right when you need it. The day­time tablets will give you the en­ergy to keep go­ing and the night­time ones will help you get a good night’s sleep, ready for the next day.

TWEEZERS

Pointed tweezers help remove splin­ters. You can also try soak­ing the skin in warm wa­ter to ease the re­moval process. Some ho­tels will have these if you ask, but if trav­el­ling to re­mote ar­eas, bring your own.

HY­DRA­TION

Trav­el­ling, es­pe­cially by plane, can leave you de­hy­drated. Hy­dr­a­lyte or Gas­trolyte sa­chets or dis­solv­able tablets can help keep your flu­ids up. Stay­ing hy­drated can help stave off ill­ness, help you bounce back af­ter a big night or re­plen­ish your body af­ter phys­i­cal ac­tiv­ity.

PANADOL

Painkillers – Panadol, As­pirin, Nuro­fen – are es­sen­tial. Headaches, pe­riod pain or joint pain can haunt you, and hav­ing a tab in reach can help you carry on sight­see­ing when your head is call­ing you to bed. If trav­el­ling with young­sters, don’t for­get the chil­dren’s ver­sion.

ARMAFORCE

If you feel a cold com­ing on, take two ArmaForce vi­ta­mins daily and you will wake up with a spring in your step. This BioCeu­ti­cals prod­uct is a pow­er­ful im­mu­nity booster that can get rid of any flu. Packed with echi­nacea, vi­ta­min C, olive leaf and zinc, it’s a saviour in win­ter – and a must-take, wher­ever you go.

TRAVEL SICK­NESS TABLETS

If you suf­fer mo­tion sick­ness, planes, boats and fast cars can make you ill at the thought. Try Trava­calm Nat­u­ral tablets, Aquatabs or Na­ture’s Way gin­ger tablets to see what works best.

IN­CI­DEN­TALS

Think about things that hap­pen to you – it might be Imod­ium for a weak stom­ach, or a strip of throat lozenges. Sun­screen, a pre­scrip­tion for an­tibi­otics, con­tra­cep­tion, a sa­chet of Ural if you suf­fer uri­nary tract in­fec­tions – it’s al­ways safe to have them on hand, wher­ever you are.

An­ti­sep­tic cream and a ban­dage for a child’s scraped knee can make all the dif­fer­ence.

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